Why investing in personal navigation device a good idea Asking for directions may be difficult when you are in an area where the landmarks and language are unfamiliar This is why personal navigation devices or PNDs as they are commonly referred to are becoming an integral part of the mobile executives digital arsenal Why can t you simply use the GPS enabled smartphone The idea of investing in a PND might seem extravagant to many people given that today almost every mid segment smartphone and tablet in the market comes with GPS connectivity and built in maps or navigation of some sort For late initiates to the navigation tech GPS stands for global positioning system which helps pinpoint your location by using special satellite connections If your device also has a map GPS can show you exactly where you are In case your system has a navigation software the gadget will even help you plot your route from one place to another complete with turn by turn instructions through voice and or text While most smartphones and tablets can help navigate and chart routes saving you the need to purchase and carry an extra gadget they have their limitations For one they are not designed solely for navigation so your routing experience could be disturbed by incoming calls texts or e mails Secondly neither the speaker system nor the display on a handset is meant to help you find your way There s also the issue of the battery draining out fast when you have the GPS running Add to these the fact that most smartphones depend to an extent on mobile network connectivity to pinpoint your location via A GPS or assisted GPS This effectively limits you to areas that are supported by a particular operator while adding to your data usage bill These are the various reasons why relying solely on a handset or tablet to find your way might not be the best option The PND edge The PNDs easily score over smartphones since most of these sport relatively large displays 3 5 inch and above and come with speakers that are louder than those of most handsets What s more they do not rely on a mobile network or Wi Fi to pinpoint your location so you can use them virtually anywhere without worrying about picking up data charges These devices also tend to handle navigation extremely smoothly as they have been designed solely for this purpose You can simply switch on a PND indicate where you want to go and follow the route and instructions it gives Almost all of them come with voice navigation Unlike phones and tablets most PNDs do not run multiple applications so battery life and speed of operation in navigation mode are significantly better Of course they have their drawbacks As there is no Internet connectivity built into most PNDs you have to connect the device to a computer to get new maps when they are updated This can be cumbersome and time consuming especially if you have a slow Net connection However it is not advisable to skip this exercise especially in a country like India where roads and routes change new landmarks emerge and old ones disappear very frequently This brings us to another shortcoming As these devices depend on maps that are pre installed and have to be updated manually their utility is limited when it comes to discovering new routes or spotting new landmarks Source Gesia

:: Why investing in personal navigation device a good idea ::

 Asking for directions may be difficult when you are in an area where the landmarks and language are unfamiliar. This is why personal navigation devices, or PNDs, as they are commonly referred to, are becoming an integral part of the mobile executives' digital arsenal.

Why can't you simply use the GPS-enabled smartphone?
The idea of investing in a PND might seem extravagant to many people, given that today almost every mid-segment smartphone and tablet in the market comes with GPS connectivity and built-in maps or navigation of some sort. For late initiates to the navigation tech, GPS stands for global positioning system, which helps pinpoint your location by using special satellite connections. If your device also has a map, GPS can show you exactly where you are. In case your system has a navigation software, the gadget will even help you plot your route from one place to another, complete with turn-by-turn instructions through voice and/or text. While most smartphones and tablets can help navigate and chart routes, saving you the need to purchase and carry an extra gadget, they have their limitations. For one, they are not designed solely for navigation, so your routing experience could be disturbed by incoming calls, texts or e-mails. Secondly, neither the speaker system nor the display on a handset is meant to help you find your way. There's also the issue of the battery draining out fast when you have the GPS running. Add to these the fact that most smartphones depend to an extent on mobile network connectivity to pinpoint your location (via A-GPS or assisted GPS). This effectively limits you to areas that are supported by a particular operator, while adding to your data usage bill. These are the various reasons why relying solely on a handset or tablet to find your way might not be the best option.

The PND edge
The PNDs easily score over smartphones since most of these sport relatively large displays (3.5 inch and above) and come with speakers that are louder than those of most handsets. What's more, they do not rely on a mobile network or Wi-Fi to pinpoint your location, so you can use them virtually anywhere without worrying about picking up data charges. These devices also tend to handle navigation extremely smoothly as they have been designed solely for this purpose. You can simply switch on a PND, indicate where you want to go and follow the route and instructions it gives. Almost all of them come with voice navigation. Unlike phones and tablets, most PNDs do not run multiple applications, so battery life and speed of operation (in navigation mode) are significantly better. Of course, they have their drawbacks. As there is no Internet connectivity built into most PNDs, you have to connect the device to a computer to get new maps when they are updated. This can be cumbersome and time-consuming, especially if you have a slow Net connection. However, it is not advisable to skip this exercise, especially in a country like India, where roads and routes change, new landmarks emerge and old ones disappear very frequently. This brings us to another shortcoming. As these devices depend on maps that are pre-installed and have to be updated manually, their utility is limited when it comes to discovering new routes or spotting new landmarks.
Source :- Gesia

:: Why investing in personal navigation device a good idea ::

Asking for directions may be difficult when you are in an area where the landmarks and language are unfamiliar. This is why personal navigation devices, or PNDs, as they are commonly referred to, are becoming an integral part of the mobile executives' digital arsenal.

Why can't you simply use the GPS-enabled smartphone?
The idea of investing in a PND might seem extravagant to many people, given that today almost every mid-segment smartphone and tablet in the market comes with GPS connectivity and built-in maps or navigation of some sort. For late initiates to the navigation tech, GPS stands for global positioning system, which helps pinpoint your location by using special satellite connections. If your device also has a map, GPS can show you exactly where you are. In case your system has a navigation software, the gadget will even help you plot your route from one place to another, complete with turn-by-turn instructions through voice and/or text. While most smartphones and tablets can help navigate and chart routes, saving you the need to purchase and carry an extra gadget, they have their limitations. For one, they are not designed solely for navigation, so your routing experience could be disturbed by incoming calls, texts or e-mails. Secondly, neither the speaker system nor the display on a handset is meant to help you find your way. There's also the issue of the battery draining out fast when you have the GPS running. Add to these the fact that most smartphones depend to an extent on mobile network connectivity to pinpoint your location (via A-GPS or assisted GPS). This effectively limits you to areas that are supported by a particular operator, while adding to your data usage bill. These are the various reasons why relying solely on a handset or tablet to find your way might not be the best option.

The PND edge
The PNDs easily score over smartphones since most of these sport relatively large displays (3.5 inch and above) and come with speakers that are louder than those of most handsets. What's more, they do not rely on a mobile network or Wi-Fi to pinpoint your location, so you can use them virtually anywhere without worrying about picking up data charges. These devices also tend to handle navigation extremely smoothly as they have been designed solely for this purpose. You can simply switch on a PND, indicate where you want to go and follow the route and instructions it gives. Almost all of them come with voice navigation. Unlike phones and tablets, most PNDs do not run multiple applications, so battery life and speed of operation (in navigation mode) are significantly better. Of course, they have their drawbacks. As there is no Internet connectivity built into most PNDs, you have to connect the device to a computer to get new maps when they are updated. This can be cumbersome and time-consuming, especially if you have a slow Net connection. However, it is not advisable to skip this exercise, especially in a country like India, where roads and routes change, new landmarks emerge and old ones disappear very frequently. This brings us to another shortcoming. As these devices depend on maps that are pre-installed and have to be updated manually, their utility is limited when it comes to discovering new routes or spotting new landmarks.
Source :- Gesia

:: Why investing in personal navigation device a good idea :: Asking for directions may be difficult when you are in an area where the landmarks and language are unfamiliar. This is why personal navigation devices, or PNDs, as they are commonly referred to, are becoming an integral part of the mobile executives' digital arsenal. Why can't you simply use the GPS-enabled smartphone? The idea of investing in a PND might seem extravagant to many people, given that today almost every mid-segment smartphone and tablet in the market comes with GPS connectivity and built-in maps or navigation of some sort. For late initiates to the navigation tech, GPS stands for global positioning system, which helps pinpoint your location by using special satellite connections. If your device also has a map, GPS can show you exactly where you are. In case your system has a navigation software, the gadget will even help you plot your route from one place to another, complete with turn-by-turn instructions through voice and/or text. While most smartphones and tablets can help navigate and chart routes, saving you the need to purchase and carry an extra gadget, they have their limitations. For one, they are not designed solely for navigation, so your routing experience could be disturbed by incoming calls, texts or e-mails. Secondly, neither the speaker system nor the display on a handset is meant to help you find your way. There's also the issue of the battery draining out fast when you have the GPS running. Add to these the fact that most smartphones depend to an extent on mobile network connectivity to pinpoint your location (via A-GPS or assisted GPS). This effectively limits you to areas that are supported by a particular operator, while adding to your data usage bill. These are the various reasons why relying solely on a handset or tablet to find your way might not be the best option. The PND edge The PNDs easily score over smartphones since most of these sport relatively large displays (3.5 inch and above) and come with speakers that are louder than those of most handsets. What's more, they do not rely on a mobile network or Wi-Fi to pinpoint your location, so you can use them virtually anywhere without worrying about picking up data charges. These devices also tend to handle navigation extremely smoothly as they have been designed solely for this purpose. You can simply switch on a PND, indicate where you want to go and follow the route and instructions it gives. Almost all of them come with voice navigation. Unlike phones and tablets, most PNDs do not run multiple applications, so battery life and speed of operation (in navigation mode) are significantly better. Of course, they have their drawbacks. As there is no Internet connectivity built into most PNDs, you have to connect the device to a computer to get new maps when they are updated. This can be cumbersome and time-consuming, especially if you have a slow Net connection. However, it is not advisable to skip this exercise, especially in a country like India, where roads and routes change, new landmarks emerge and old ones disappear very frequently. This brings us to another shortcoming. As these devices depend on maps that are pre-installed and have to be updated manually, their utility is limited when it comes to discovering new routes or spotting new landmarks. Source :- Gesia

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