NASA satellite to crash into the Earth on Friday A satellite that is not functioning properly may fall out of its orbit back to the Earth this Friday Scientists are still not able to conclude as to where the satellite would crash The satellite weighs 6 5 tones and is an Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite UARS was carried into its orbit by a space shuttle in 1991 The UARS completed the task for which it was placed in its orbit in 2005 and since then it has been losing its altitude and moving towards the Earth The 35 foot long 15 foot diameter is expected to enter the Earth s atmosphere on the coming Friday and although most part of the satellite has been lost due to incineration scientists are expecting around 26 pieces to enter the Earth s atmosphere and they will weigh close to 500 kg The satellite s orbit passes from the north of Canada to the Southern part of South America Most probably the debris will fall into the sea or on uninhabited land Such incidents occur every year but there have not been any casualties till date and the probability of the satellite debris to hit a human is one in 3200 The biggest chunk of the satellite that will enter the Earth s atmosphere will weigh close to 151 kg source techieask com

NASA satellite to crash into the Earth on Friday
A satellite that is not functioning properly may fall out of its orbit, back to the Earth this Friday. Scientists are still not able to conclude as to where the satellite would crash. The satellite weighs 6.5 tones and is an Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) was carried into its orbit by a space shuttle in 1991. The UARS completed the task for which it was placed in its orbit in 2005 and since then it has been losing its altitude and moving towards the Earth.

The 35-foot-long, 15-foot diameter is expected to enter the Earth’s atmosphere on the coming Friday and although most part of the satellite has been lost due to incineration, scientists are expecting around 26 pieces to enter the Earth’s atmosphere and they will weigh close to 500 kg. The satellite’s orbit passes from the north of Canada to the Southern part of South America.

Most probably the debris will fall into the sea or on uninhabited land. Such incidents occur every year but there have not been any casualties till date and the probability of the satellite debris to hit a human is one in 3200. The biggest chunk of the satellite that will enter the Earth’s atmosphere will weigh close to 151 kg.
source: techieask.com

NASA satellite to crash into the Earth on Friday
A satellite that is not functioning properly may fall out of its orbit, back to the Earth this Friday. Scientists are still not able to conclude as to where the satellite would crash. The satellite weighs 6.5 tones and is an Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) was carried into its orbit by a space shuttle in 1991. The UARS completed the task for which it was placed in its orbit in 2005 and since then it has been losing its altitude and moving towards the Earth.

The 35-foot-long, 15-foot diameter is expected to enter the Earth’s atmosphere on the coming Friday and although most part of the satellite has been lost due to incineration, scientists are expecting around 26 pieces to enter the Earth’s atmosphere and they will weigh close to 500 kg. The satellite’s orbit passes from the north of Canada to the Southern part of South America.

Most probably the debris will fall into the sea or on uninhabited land. Such incidents occur every year but there have not been any casualties till date and the probability of the satellite debris to hit a human is one in 3200. The biggest chunk of the satellite that will enter the Earth’s atmosphere will weigh close to 151 kg.
source: techieask.com

NASA satellite to crash into the Earth on Friday A satellite that is not functioning properly may fall out of its orbit, back to the Earth this Friday. Scientists are still not able to conclude as to where the satellite would crash. The satellite weighs 6.5 tones and is an Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) was carried into its orbit by a space shuttle in 1991. The UARS completed the task for which it was placed in its orbit in 2005 and since then it has been losing its altitude and moving towards the Earth. The 35-foot-long, 15-foot diameter is expected to enter the Earth’s atmosphere on the coming Friday and although most part of the satellite has been lost due to incineration, scientists are expecting around 26 pieces to enter the Earth’s atmosphere and they will weigh close to 500 kg. The satellite’s orbit passes from the north of Canada to the Southern part of South America. Most probably the debris will fall into the sea or on uninhabited land. Such incidents occur every year but there have not been any casualties till date and the probability of the satellite debris to hit a human is one in 3200. The biggest chunk of the satellite that will enter the Earth’s atmosphere will weigh close to 151 kg. source: techieask.com

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