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How #Apple's New #iPhones Will Change Mobile Gaming : The 64-bit A7 Chip The iPhone 5S's A7 chip is the first mobile device to use 64-bit architecture, a huge leap for all the technology. http://mashable.com/2013/09/12/iphone-5s-gaming/

How #Apple's New #iPhones Will Change Mobile Gaming : The 64-bit A7 Chip The iPhone 5S's A7 chip is the first mobile device to use 64-bit architecture, a huge leap for all the technology. http://mashable.com/2013/09/12/iphone-5s-gaming/

How #Apple's New #iPhones Will Change Mobile Gaming : The 64-bit A7 Chip The iPhone 5S's A7 chip is the first mobile device to use 64-bit architecture, a huge leap for all the technology. http://mashable.com/2013/09/12/iphone-5s-gaming/

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Are We Living Inside a Computer Simulation? The popular film trilogy, The Matrix, presented a cyberuniverse where humans live in a simulated reality created by sentient machines. Now, a philosopher and team of physicists imagine that we might really be living inside a computer-generated universe that you could call The Lattice. What's more, we may be able to detect it. In 2003, British philosopher Nick Bostrom published a paper that proposed the universe we live in might in fact really be a numerical computer simulation. To give this a bizarre Twilight Zone twist, he suggested that our far-evolved distant descendants might construct such a program to simulate the past and recreate how their remote ancestors lived. He felt that such an experiment was inevitable for a supercivilization. If it didn't happen by now, then in meant that humanity never evolved that far and we're doomed to a short lifespan as a species, he argued. Read more : http://mashable.com/2012/12/17/the-lattice/

Are We Living Inside a Computer Simulation? The popular film trilogy, The Matrix, presented a cyberuniverse where humans live in a simulated reality created by sentient machines. Now, a philosopher and team of physicists imagine that we might really be living inside a computer-generated universe that you could call The Lattice. What's more, we may be able to detect it. In 2003, British philosopher Nick Bostrom published a paper that proposed the universe we live in might in fact really be a numerical computer simulation. To give this a bizarre Twilight Zone twist, he suggested that our far-evolved distant descendants might construct such a program to simulate the past and recreate how their remote ancestors lived. He felt that such an experiment was inevitable for a supercivilization. If it didn't happen by now, then in meant that humanity never evolved that far and we're doomed to a short lifespan as a species, he argued. Read more : http://mashable.com/2012/12/17/the-lattice/

Are We Living Inside a Computer Simulation? The popular film trilogy, The Matrix, presented a cyberuniverse where humans live in a simulated reality created by sentient machines. Now, a philosopher and team of physicists imagine that we might really be living inside a computer-generated universe that you could call The Lattice. What's more, we may be able to detect it. In 2003, British philosopher Nick Bostrom published a paper that proposed the universe we live in might in fact really be a numerical computer simulation. To give this a bizarre Twilight Zone twist, he suggested that our far-evolved distant descendants might construct such a program to simulate the past and recreate how their remote ancestors lived. He felt that such an experiment was inevitable for a supercivilization. If it didn't happen by now, then in meant that humanity never evolved that far and we're doomed to a short lifespan as a species, he argued. Read more : http://mashable.com/2012/12/17/the-lattice/

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We’ve been hearing the rumors for months, and now Samsung has gotten official with the newest member of its Galaxy line of smartphones, the Galaxy S III. Samsung announced the most anticipated Android handset of the year Thursday at an event in London. The phone is the third-generation in a line of popular smartphones created by Samsung. The phone has a 4.8-inch touchscreen, 8-megapixel rear-facing and 1.9-megapixel forward-facing camera, and comes running the latest version of Android — Ice Cream Sandwich. Much like the HTC One X, the camera has zero shutter lag so you can capture photos instantly. The camera is also capable of taking 20 photos at once in burst mode, and a feature called “Best Photo” will pick the best shot out of a group of eight. The NFC-capable Galaxy S III has a Super AMOLED HD (1280×720) screen, offering more subpixels than other screens, resulting in improved colors as well as better visibility in bright situations. “With the GALAXY S III, Samsung has maximized the consumer benefits by integrating superior hardware with enhanced smartphone usability,” said JK Shin, President and Head of IT & Mobile Communications Division at Samsung. “Designed to be both effortlessly smart and intuitively simple, the GALAXY S III has been created with our human needs and capabilities in mind. What makes me most proud is that it enables one of the most seamless, natural and human-centric mobile experiences, opening up a new horizon that allows you to live a life extraordinary.” The phone is powered by a 1.4GHz Samsung Exynos 4 Quad processor (see video below). The Exynos 4 has twice the processing capability of the older Exynos 4 Dual used in previous Galaxy phones, and it consumes 20% less power. To achieve this level of efficiency, Samsung has implemented on-off switching as well as dynamic voltage and frequency scaling for each core. All that means the processor will consume exactly the amount of power it needs under any given workload. -Source Mashable

We’ve been hearing the rumors for months, and now Samsung has gotten official with the newest member of its Galaxy line of smartphones, the Galaxy S III. Samsung announced the most anticipated Android handset of the year Thursday at an event in London. The phone is the third-generation in a line of popular smartphones created by Samsung. The phone has a 4.8-inch touchscreen, 8-megapixel rear-facing and 1.9-megapixel forward-facing camera, and comes running the latest version of Android — Ice Cream Sandwich. Much like the HTC One X, the camera has zero shutter lag so you can capture photos instantly. The camera is also capable of taking 20 photos at once in burst mode, and a feature called “Best Photo” will pick the best shot out of a group of eight. The NFC-capable Galaxy S III has a Super AMOLED HD (1280×720) screen, offering more subpixels than other screens, resulting in improved colors as well as better visibility in bright situations. “With the GALAXY S III, Samsung has maximized the consumer benefits by integrating superior hardware with enhanced smartphone usability,” said JK Shin, President and Head of IT & Mobile Communications Division at Samsung. “Designed to be both effortlessly smart and intuitively simple, the GALAXY S III has been created with our human needs and capabilities in mind. What makes me most proud is that it enables one of the most seamless, natural and human-centric mobile experiences, opening up a new horizon that allows you to live a life extraordinary.” The phone is powered by a 1.4GHz Samsung Exynos 4 Quad processor (see video below). The Exynos 4 has twice the processing capability of the older Exynos 4 Dual used in previous Galaxy phones, and it consumes 20% less power. To achieve this level of efficiency, Samsung has implemented on-off switching as well as dynamic voltage and frequency scaling for each core. All that means the processor will consume exactly the amount of power it needs under any given workload. -Source Mashable

We’ve been hearing the rumors for months, and now Samsung has gotten official with the newest member of its Galaxy line of smartphones, the Galaxy S III. Samsung announced the most anticipated Android handset of the year Thursday at an event in London. The phone is the third-generation in a line of popular smartphones created by Samsung. The phone has a 4.8-inch touchscreen, 8-megapixel rear-facing and 1.9-megapixel forward-facing camera, and comes running the latest version of Android — Ice Cream Sandwich. Much like the HTC One X, the camera has zero shutter lag so you can capture photos instantly. The camera is also capable of taking 20 photos at once in burst mode, and a feature called “Best Photo” will pick the best shot out of a group of eight. The NFC-capable Galaxy S III has a Super AMOLED HD (1280×720) screen, offering more subpixels than other screens, resulting in improved colors as well as better visibility in bright situations. “With the GALAXY S III, Samsung has maximized the consumer benefits by integrating superior hardware with enhanced smartphone usability,” said JK Shin, President and Head of IT & Mobile Communications Division at Samsung. “Designed to be both effortlessly smart and intuitively simple, the GALAXY S III has been created with our human needs and capabilities in mind. What makes me most proud is that it enables one of the most seamless, natural and human-centric mobile experiences, opening up a new horizon that allows you to live a life extraordinary.” The phone is powered by a 1.4GHz Samsung Exynos 4 Quad processor (see video below). The Exynos 4 has twice the processing capability of the older Exynos 4 Dual used in previous Galaxy phones, and it consumes 20% less power. To achieve this level of efficiency, Samsung has implemented on-off switching as well as dynamic voltage and frequency scaling for each core. All that means the processor will consume exactly the amount of power it needs under any given workload. -Source Mashable

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Google co-founder Sergey Brin is worried about the future of the internet. There are “very powerful forces that have lined up against the open internet on all sides and around the world,” he said in an interview with The Guardian. According to Brin, one of the biggest threats to the openness of the internet is pressure from governments, which are trying to control the information flow on the internet. The overzealous entertainment industry, which is trying to end piracy, is another threat, and walled gardens raised by companies such as Facebook and Apple, which control what software can be released on their platforms, is equally dangerous, claims Brin. “I am more worried than I have been in the past. It’s scary,” he said. Brin specifically targets Facebook for its unwillingness to share its users’ data with others, claiming it would be impossible to create a company like Google if the internet was dominated by Facebook. “You have to play by their rules, which are really restrictive,” he said. Brin is directly criticizing Google’s competitors here, but he’s in a unique position. On one hand, Google famously pulled out most of its operations in China in the name of free speech in January 2010. Furthemore, Google’s Android mobile platform is open-source, in contrast of Apple’s closed and proprietary iOS platform. On the other, Google itself has often been criticized due to privacy concerns, which prompted the company to release a new, unified privacy policy in February 2012. Google owns a lot of private data about its users, and has at times been forced to hand it to the U.S. authorities. “We do everything possible to protect the data. If we could wave a magic wand and not be subject to US law, that would be great. If we could be in some magical jurisdiction that everyone in the world trusted, that would be great … We’re doing it as well as can be done,” claims Brin. What do you think: Is Google one of those “powerful forces” lined up against the open internet, or is it one of the good guys? Or is the truth somewhere in between? Share your opinions in the comments. -Source: Mashable

Google co-founder Sergey Brin is worried about the future of the internet. There are “very powerful forces that have lined up against the open internet on all sides and around the world,” he said in an interview with The Guardian. According to Brin, one of the biggest threats to the openness of the internet is pressure from governments, which are trying to control the information flow on the internet. The overzealous entertainment industry, which is trying to end piracy, is another threat, and walled gardens raised by companies such as Facebook and Apple, which control what software can be released on their platforms, is equally dangerous, claims Brin. “I am more worried than I have been in the past. It’s scary,” he said. Brin specifically targets Facebook for its unwillingness to share its users’ data with others, claiming it would be impossible to create a company like Google if the internet was dominated by Facebook. “You have to play by their rules, which are really restrictive,” he said. Brin is directly criticizing Google’s competitors here, but he’s in a unique position. On one hand, Google famously pulled out most of its operations in China in the name of free speech in January 2010. Furthemore, Google’s Android mobile platform is open-source, in contrast of Apple’s closed and proprietary iOS platform. On the other, Google itself has often been criticized due to privacy concerns, which prompted the company to release a new, unified privacy policy in February 2012. Google owns a lot of private data about its users, and has at times been forced to hand it to the U.S. authorities. “We do everything possible to protect the data. If we could wave a magic wand and not be subject to US law, that would be great. If we could be in some magical jurisdiction that everyone in the world trusted, that would be great … We’re doing it as well as can be done,” claims Brin. What do you think: Is Google one of those “powerful forces” lined up against the open internet, or is it one of the good guys? Or is the truth somewhere in between? Share your opinions in the comments. -Source: Mashable

Google co-founder Sergey Brin is worried about the future of the internet. There are “very powerful forces that have lined up against the open internet on all sides and around the world,” he said in an interview with The Guardian. According to Brin, one of the biggest threats to the openness of the internet is pressure from governments, which are trying to control the information flow on the internet. The overzealous entertainment industry, which is trying to end piracy, is another threat, and walled gardens raised by companies such as Facebook and Apple, which control what software can be released on their platforms, is equally dangerous, claims Brin. “I am more worried than I have been in the past. It’s scary,” he said. Brin specifically targets Facebook for its unwillingness to share its users’ data with others, claiming it would be impossible to create a company like Google if the internet was dominated by Facebook. “You have to play by their rules, which are really restrictive,” he said. Brin is directly criticizing Google’s competitors here, but he’s in a unique position. On one hand, Google famously pulled out most of its operations in China in the name of free speech in January 2010. Furthemore, Google’s Android mobile platform is open-source, in contrast of Apple’s closed and proprietary iOS platform. On the other, Google itself has often been criticized due to privacy concerns, which prompted the company to release a new, unified privacy policy in February 2012. Google owns a lot of private data about its users, and has at times been forced to hand it to the U.S. authorities. “We do everything possible to protect the data. If we could wave a magic wand and not be subject to US law, that would be great. If we could be in some magical jurisdiction that everyone in the world trusted, that would be great … We’re doing it as well as can be done,” claims Brin. What do you think: Is Google one of those “powerful forces” lined up against the open internet, or is it one of the good guys? Or is the truth somewhere in between? Share your opinions in the comments. -Source: Mashable

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Do you have a special geek in your life? Then don’t send them an ordinary card this Valentine’s Day — mail them an awesome geeky design that will speak right to their heart. Source :- mashable.com

Do you have a special geek in your life? Then don’t send them an ordinary card this Valentine’s Day — mail them an awesome geeky design that will speak right to their heart. Source :- mashable.com

Do you have a special geek in your life? Then don’t send them an ordinary card this Valentine’s Day — mail them an awesome geeky design that will speak right to their heart. Source :- mashable.com

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It feels like it’s happening overnight, but Facebook has been marching toward an initial public offering (IPO) for almost eight years. Mark Zuckerberg created “TheFacebook” way back in 2004, nurturing it from dorm-room dream to Silicon Valley mega-success during that time, and along the way he repeatedly dodged questions of when the company would offer stock. Actually, some very lucky people have been able to own a chunk of Facebook for a while now. Apart from major investors like Microsoft and Russia’s Digital Sky — both of which invested substantially in the company over the years — Facebook employees have been able to buy and sell their stake in Facebook on secondary markets since 2009. If buzz is any indication, that stake will soon be worth a lot. Facebook is said to be filing for its much-anticipated public offering on Wednesday this week, and estimates for how much the company will be worth once it’s done are in the $100 billion range. That would make the social network about four times the value of Google at the time it went public in 2004 with a valuation at $23 billion. Source:- mashable.com

It feels like it’s happening overnight, but Facebook has been marching toward an initial public offering (IPO) for almost eight years. Mark Zuckerberg created “TheFacebook” way back in 2004, nurturing it from dorm-room dream to Silicon Valley mega-success during that time, and along the way he repeatedly dodged questions of when the company would offer stock. Actually, some very lucky people have been able to own a chunk of Facebook for a while now. Apart from major investors like Microsoft and Russia’s Digital Sky — both of which invested substantially in the company over the years — Facebook employees have been able to buy and sell their stake in Facebook on secondary markets since 2009. If buzz is any indication, that stake will soon be worth a lot. Facebook is said to be filing for its much-anticipated public offering on Wednesday this week, and estimates for how much the company will be worth once it’s done are in the $100 billion range. That would make the social network about four times the value of Google at the time it went public in 2004 with a valuation at $23 billion. Source:- mashable.com

It feels like it’s happening overnight, but Facebook has been marching toward an initial public offering (IPO) for almost eight years. Mark Zuckerberg created “TheFacebook” way back in 2004, nurturing it from dorm-room dream to Silicon Valley mega-success during that time, and along the way he repeatedly dodged questions of when the company would offer stock. Actually, some very lucky people have been able to own a chunk of Facebook for a while now. Apart from major investors like Microsoft and Russia’s Digital Sky — both of which invested substantially in the company over the years — Facebook employees have been able to buy and sell their stake in Facebook on secondary markets since 2009. If buzz is any indication, that stake will soon be worth a lot. Facebook is said to be filing for its much-anticipated public offering on Wednesday this week, and estimates for how much the company will be worth once it’s done are in the $100 billion range. That would make the social network about four times the value of Google at the time it went public in 2004 with a valuation at $23 billion. Source:- mashable.com

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:: Steve Jobs, Mark Zuckerberg on Greatest Innovators List :: Steve Jobs has been named the second greatest innovator of all time, behind Thomas Edison, in the 2012 Lemelson-MIT Invention Index. The data comes from a survey asking 1,010 Americans ages 16 – 25 to identify the greatest innovator of all time. The majority of surveyed young Americans – 52% – chose Edison as the greatest innovator. 24% chose Jobs, followed by Alexander Bell, Marie Curie and Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg, who received 3% of the votes. These two figures are doing so well on the list because young adults feel that the technology Jobs and Zuckerberg helped create greatly influences their daily lives. For example, 40 percent of respondents said they couldn’t imagine their life without a smartphone or a tablet. However, the respondents aren’t so sure whether they’d try to become innovators themselves. 45 percent said that invention is not given enough attention in their school, and 28 percent said their education left them unprepared to enter the fields that lead to innovation, namely science, technology, engineering or math. “This year’s survey revealed that less than half of respondents have done things like used a drill or hand-held power tool, or made something out of raw materials in the past year. We must engage students in these types of invention experiences as well as provide a strong STEM education to drive future innovators,” said Leigh Estabrooks, the Lemelson-MIT Program’s invention education officer. Source :- mashable.com

:: Steve Jobs, Mark Zuckerberg on Greatest Innovators List :: Steve Jobs has been named the second greatest innovator of all time, behind Thomas Edison, in the 2012 Lemelson-MIT Invention Index. The data comes from a survey asking 1,010 Americans ages 16 – 25 to identify the greatest innovator of all time. The majority of surveyed young Americans – 52% – chose Edison as the greatest innovator. 24% chose Jobs, followed by Alexander Bell, Marie Curie and Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg, who received 3% of the votes. These two figures are doing so well on the list because young adults feel that the technology Jobs and Zuckerberg helped create greatly influences their daily lives. For example, 40 percent of respondents said they couldn’t imagine their life without a smartphone or a tablet. However, the respondents aren’t so sure whether they’d try to become innovators themselves. 45 percent said that invention is not given enough attention in their school, and 28 percent said their education left them unprepared to enter the fields that lead to innovation, namely science, technology, engineering or math. “This year’s survey revealed that less than half of respondents have done things like used a drill or hand-held power tool, or made something out of raw materials in the past year. We must engage students in these types of invention experiences as well as provide a strong STEM education to drive future innovators,” said Leigh Estabrooks, the Lemelson-MIT Program’s invention education officer. Source :- mashable.com

:: Steve Jobs, Mark Zuckerberg on Greatest Innovators List :: Steve Jobs has been named the second greatest innovator of all time, behind Thomas Edison, in the 2012 Lemelson-MIT Invention Index. The data comes from a survey asking 1,010 Americans ages 16 – 25 to identify the greatest innovator of all time. The majority of surveyed young Americans – 52% – chose Edison as the greatest innovator. 24% chose Jobs, followed by Alexander Bell, Marie Curie and Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg, who received 3% of the votes. These two figures are doing so well on the list because young adults feel that the technology Jobs and Zuckerberg helped create greatly influences their daily lives. For example, 40 percent of respondents said they couldn’t imagine their life without a smartphone or a tablet. However, the respondents aren’t so sure whether they’d try to become innovators themselves. 45 percent said that invention is not given enough attention in their school, and 28 percent said their education left them unprepared to enter the fields that lead to innovation, namely science, technology, engineering or math. “This year’s survey revealed that less than half of respondents have done things like used a drill or hand-held power tool, or made something out of raw materials in the past year. We must engage students in these types of invention experiences as well as provide a strong STEM education to drive future innovators,” said Leigh Estabrooks, the Lemelson-MIT Program’s invention education officer. Source :- mashable.com

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:: Nike Unveils FuelBand for Tracking All Physical Activity :: Nike has unveiled the Nike+ FuelBand, a product that fits around your wrist and aims to provide a common metric for tracking all physical activities. Building on Nike+, a product that the company launched in 2006 for runners, the FuelBand tracks what the company calls NikeFuel, which lets people compare a game of basketball to a dance class, for example. Nike’s VP Global Brand Trevor Edwards said at a press event in New York City that the product, “Allows everyone to measure up and compete with others.” The band itself tracks activity through oxygen kinetics, which helps it determine whether a user is engaged in an intense sporting activity or sitting at a desk. Nike believes this will provide more precise measurement than simply tracking steps, and allow it to account for the differences across various sports (the device also tracks steps, calories, and time, however). The company demonstrated this by showing the huge spike in activity that pro basketball player Kevin Durant sees during practice and games. Durant (and all eventual users) can sync his FuelBand with Nike+ via bluetooth or USB. That data is then available via a mobile app or desktop software. While Nike sees its tracking capabilities as a differentiator, it also believes it has cracked the nut on motivating people to be more fit. The company lets users set daily NikeFuel score goals, and the FuelBand uses red, yellow, or green coloring to let users know how they’re doing toward their goal. Like Nike+, there’s also integration with Twitter and Facebook, so users can share their Fuel score with friends. Source :- mashable.com

:: Nike Unveils FuelBand for Tracking All Physical Activity :: Nike has unveiled the Nike+ FuelBand, a product that fits around your wrist and aims to provide a common metric for tracking all physical activities. Building on Nike+, a product that the company launched in 2006 for runners, the FuelBand tracks what the company calls NikeFuel, which lets people compare a game of basketball to a dance class, for example. Nike’s VP Global Brand Trevor Edwards said at a press event in New York City that the product, “Allows everyone to measure up and compete with others.” The band itself tracks activity through oxygen kinetics, which helps it determine whether a user is engaged in an intense sporting activity or sitting at a desk. Nike believes this will provide more precise measurement than simply tracking steps, and allow it to account for the differences across various sports (the device also tracks steps, calories, and time, however). The company demonstrated this by showing the huge spike in activity that pro basketball player Kevin Durant sees during practice and games. Durant (and all eventual users) can sync his FuelBand with Nike+ via bluetooth or USB. That data is then available via a mobile app or desktop software. While Nike sees its tracking capabilities as a differentiator, it also believes it has cracked the nut on motivating people to be more fit. The company lets users set daily NikeFuel score goals, and the FuelBand uses red, yellow, or green coloring to let users know how they’re doing toward their goal. Like Nike+, there’s also integration with Twitter and Facebook, so users can share their Fuel score with friends. Source :- mashable.com

:: Nike Unveils FuelBand for Tracking All Physical Activity :: Nike has unveiled the Nike+ FuelBand, a product that fits around your wrist and aims to provide a common metric for tracking all physical activities. Building on Nike+, a product that the company launched in 2006 for runners, the FuelBand tracks what the company calls NikeFuel, which lets people compare a game of basketball to a dance class, for example. Nike’s VP Global Brand Trevor Edwards said at a press event in New York City that the product, “Allows everyone to measure up and compete with others.” The band itself tracks activity through oxygen kinetics, which helps it determine whether a user is engaged in an intense sporting activity or sitting at a desk. Nike believes this will provide more precise measurement than simply tracking steps, and allow it to account for the differences across various sports (the device also tracks steps, calories, and time, however). The company demonstrated this by showing the huge spike in activity that pro basketball player Kevin Durant sees during practice and games. Durant (and all eventual users) can sync his FuelBand with Nike+ via bluetooth or USB. That data is then available via a mobile app or desktop software. While Nike sees its tracking capabilities as a differentiator, it also believes it has cracked the nut on motivating people to be more fit. The company lets users set daily NikeFuel score goals, and the FuelBand uses red, yellow, or green coloring to let users know how they’re doing toward their goal. Like Nike+, there’s also integration with Twitter and Facebook, so users can share their Fuel score with friends. Source :- mashable.com

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The Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA) and Protect IP Act (PIPA) are landing in the U.S. Senate next week and a whirlpool of online protest has fired up again. The two bills intend to stop online piracy and protect copyright holders, however, critics claim they infringe upon creativity, Internet security and innovation by punishing websites that link to any copyright-infringing sites, even by accident. Wikipedia and a number of major sites including Reddit, Mozilla and TwitPic will go offline on Wednesday to protest. Wikipedia co-founder Jimmy Wales made the announcement on Twitter, joking that students should “do [their] homework early.” Wikipedia is a massive resource for students and professionals alike. What will a day without the online encyclopedia be like? In case you’re worried, we dug up some alternative information resources should you need them on Wednesday. Here are some of the best resources in a Wiki-less world. What are your thoughts on the blackout? Are these sites making the right move or is it just an inconvenience to the public? Source:- mashable.com

The Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA) and Protect IP Act (PIPA) are landing in the U.S. Senate next week and a whirlpool of online protest has fired up again. The two bills intend to stop online piracy and protect copyright holders, however, critics claim they infringe upon creativity, Internet security and innovation by punishing websites that link to any copyright-infringing sites, even by accident. Wikipedia and a number of major sites including Reddit, Mozilla and TwitPic will go offline on Wednesday to protest. Wikipedia co-founder Jimmy Wales made the announcement on Twitter, joking that students should “do [their] homework early.” Wikipedia is a massive resource for students and professionals alike. What will a day without the online encyclopedia be like? In case you’re worried, we dug up some alternative information resources should you need them on Wednesday. Here are some of the best resources in a Wiki-less world. What are your thoughts on the blackout? Are these sites making the right move or is it just an inconvenience to the public? Source:- mashable.com

The Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA) and Protect IP Act (PIPA) are landing in the U.S. Senate next week and a whirlpool of online protest has fired up again. The two bills intend to stop online piracy and protect copyright holders, however, critics claim they infringe upon creativity, Internet security and innovation by punishing websites that link to any copyright-infringing sites, even by accident. Wikipedia and a number of major sites including Reddit, Mozilla and TwitPic will go offline on Wednesday to protest. Wikipedia co-founder Jimmy Wales made the announcement on Twitter, joking that students should “do [their] homework early.” Wikipedia is a massive resource for students and professionals alike. What will a day without the online encyclopedia be like? In case you’re worried, we dug up some alternative information resources should you need them on Wednesday. Here are some of the best resources in a Wiki-less world. What are your thoughts on the blackout? Are these sites making the right move or is it just an inconvenience to the public? Source:- mashable.com

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:: Google: Sorry, Twitter, We Don’t Index the @ Symbol :: If you haven’t noticed that Google+ pages are increasingly becoming a part of Google search results, you may have noticed Google and Twitter’s increasingly public spat about it. Twitter argues that by promoting Google+ in search results, Google isn’t providing the most relevant social results. Meanwhile, Google has implied it would promote more pages from Twitter if it had adequate permission to do so. Twitter general council Alex Macgillivray then tweeted an example of why he thought Google’s new results were inefficient: Google search results for the search term “@WWE” — yes, with the “@” symbol — that did not include the organization’s Twitter page. Now Google has confirmed to Mashable that it has never indexed the “@” symbol. In other words, the search engine has never recognized a Twitter handle when it was formatted that way. So while a search for “WWE Twitter” still returns the organization’s Twitter feed before its Google+ page, “@WWE” returns the same results as “WWE” — in this case, with Google+ results first. Somehow a search for “+WWE” succeeds in returning a Google+ profile. But really, Google? The company with a car that drives itself? In more than five years of people searching for Twitter handles, you never got around to adding the @ symbol to your index? Even without the @ sign being indexed, however, the concern over the results for “@WWE” are valid: About 24,900 people have +1ed or added WWE to their circles on Google+ — but 792,642 people follow WWE on Twitter. In this case, and many others, the Twitter page is a more relevant social result than the Google+ page. Twitter ranks higher than Google+ for the WWE in Yahoo, AOL and Bing results. On the other hand, Twitter and Facebook haven’t necessarily made it easy for the search engine to feature them in results. Facebook denies Google’s crawlers access to its private pages, for one obvious reason — they’re private. Twitter includes “nofollow” links on its pages that make it hard for Google’s crawlers to index them. As Search Engine Land’s Danny Sullivan has pointed out, Google has indexed at least 3 billion pages. But Twitter users create 200 million Tweets every day that would be hard to index without access to the network’s firehose — access to which Google lost with expiration of an agreement last July. In the end, exactly how Google search results came to be dominated by Google+ pages — either as a result of having little access to other social networks or by intentionally ignoring them — isn’t that important. The important question is whether or not this domination is good for consumers. An issue which, if a complaint from privacy watchdog EPIC is effective, could be settled by the FTC. Source :- mashable.com

:: Google: Sorry, Twitter, We Don’t Index the @ Symbol :: If you haven’t noticed that Google+ pages are increasingly becoming a part of Google search results, you may have noticed Google and Twitter’s increasingly public spat about it. Twitter argues that by promoting Google+ in search results, Google isn’t providing the most relevant social results. Meanwhile, Google has implied it would promote more pages from Twitter if it had adequate permission to do so. Twitter general council Alex Macgillivray then tweeted an example of why he thought Google’s new results were inefficient: Google search results for the search term “@WWE” — yes, with the “@” symbol — that did not include the organization’s Twitter page. Now Google has confirmed to Mashable that it has never indexed the “@” symbol. In other words, the search engine has never recognized a Twitter handle when it was formatted that way. So while a search for “WWE Twitter” still returns the organization’s Twitter feed before its Google+ page, “@WWE” returns the same results as “WWE” — in this case, with Google+ results first. Somehow a search for “+WWE” succeeds in returning a Google+ profile. But really, Google? The company with a car that drives itself? In more than five years of people searching for Twitter handles, you never got around to adding the @ symbol to your index? Even without the @ sign being indexed, however, the concern over the results for “@WWE” are valid: About 24,900 people have +1ed or added WWE to their circles on Google+ — but 792,642 people follow WWE on Twitter. In this case, and many others, the Twitter page is a more relevant social result than the Google+ page. Twitter ranks higher than Google+ for the WWE in Yahoo, AOL and Bing results. On the other hand, Twitter and Facebook haven’t necessarily made it easy for the search engine to feature them in results. Facebook denies Google’s crawlers access to its private pages, for one obvious reason — they’re private. Twitter includes “nofollow” links on its pages that make it hard for Google’s crawlers to index them. As Search Engine Land’s Danny Sullivan has pointed out, Google has indexed at least 3 billion pages. But Twitter users create 200 million Tweets every day that would be hard to index without access to the network’s firehose — access to which Google lost with expiration of an agreement last July. In the end, exactly how Google search results came to be dominated by Google+ pages — either as a result of having little access to other social networks or by intentionally ignoring them — isn’t that important. The important question is whether or not this domination is good for consumers. An issue which, if a complaint from privacy watchdog EPIC is effective, could be settled by the FTC. Source :- mashable.com

:: Google: Sorry, Twitter, We Don’t Index the @ Symbol :: If you haven’t noticed that Google+ pages are increasingly becoming a part of Google search results, you may have noticed Google and Twitter’s increasingly public spat about it. Twitter argues that by promoting Google+ in search results, Google isn’t providing the most relevant social results. Meanwhile, Google has implied it would promote more pages from Twitter if it had adequate permission to do so. Twitter general council Alex Macgillivray then tweeted an example of why he thought Google’s new results were inefficient: Google search results for the search term “@WWE” — yes, with the “@” symbol — that did not include the organization’s Twitter page. Now Google has confirmed to Mashable that it has never indexed the “@” symbol. In other words, the search engine has never recognized a Twitter handle when it was formatted that way. So while a search for “WWE Twitter” still returns the organization’s Twitter feed before its Google+ page, “@WWE” returns the same results as “WWE” — in this case, with Google+ results first. Somehow a search for “+WWE” succeeds in returning a Google+ profile. But really, Google? The company with a car that drives itself? In more than five years of people searching for Twitter handles, you never got around to adding the @ symbol to your index? Even without the @ sign being indexed, however, the concern over the results for “@WWE” are valid: About 24,900 people have +1ed or added WWE to their circles on Google+ — but 792,642 people follow WWE on Twitter. In this case, and many others, the Twitter page is a more relevant social result than the Google+ page. Twitter ranks higher than Google+ for the WWE in Yahoo, AOL and Bing results. On the other hand, Twitter and Facebook haven’t necessarily made it easy for the search engine to feature them in results. Facebook denies Google’s crawlers access to its private pages, for one obvious reason — they’re private. Twitter includes “nofollow” links on its pages that make it hard for Google’s crawlers to index them. As Search Engine Land’s Danny Sullivan has pointed out, Google has indexed at least 3 billion pages. But Twitter users create 200 million Tweets every day that would be hard to index without access to the network’s firehose — access to which Google lost with expiration of an agreement last July. In the end, exactly how Google search results came to be dominated by Google+ pages — either as a result of having little access to other social networks or by intentionally ignoring them — isn’t that important. The important question is whether or not this domination is good for consumers. An issue which, if a complaint from privacy watchdog EPIC is effective, could be settled by the FTC. Source :- mashable.com

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