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... Cities of the future ... The cities of the future will be covered in 'glow-in-the-dark dust' and fed by 'urban farms' growing both on and inside buildings, according to a new report. Spray-on light absorbing dust would give public buildings, roads and pathways a phosphorescent shine at night, helping to improve the safety of parks and alleyways. Even trees could be made to glow in the dark by splicing bioluminescent genes into their trunks and branches, say experts at Arup, the engineering and design consultancy behind London's Garden Bridge project - which hopes to build a new footbridge and public garden spanning the Thames linking South Bank to Temple

... Cities of the future ... The cities of the future will be covered in 'glow-in-the-dark dust' and fed by 'urban farms' growing both on and inside buildings, according to a new report. Spray-on light absorbing dust would give public buildings, roads and pathways a phosphorescent shine at night, helping to improve the safety of parks and alleyways. Even trees could be made to glow in the dark by splicing bioluminescent genes into their trunks and branches, say experts at Arup, the engineering and design consultancy behind London's Garden Bridge project - which hopes to build a new footbridge and public garden spanning the Thames linking South Bank to Temple

... Cities of the future ... The cities of the future will be covered in 'glow-in-the-dark dust' and fed by 'urban farms' growing both on and inside buildings, according to a new report. Spray-on light absorbing dust would give public buildings, roads and pathways a phosphorescent shine at night, helping to improve the safety of parks and alleyways. Even trees could be made to glow in the dark by splicing bioluminescent genes into their trunks and branches, say experts at Arup, the engineering and design consultancy behind London's Garden Bridge project - which hopes to build a new footbridge and public garden spanning the Thames linking South Bank to Temple

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... AVEGANT GLYPH HOME THEATER HEADSET ... The home theater headset just got a name, and the first prototype looked an awful lot like what you’d see underneath a Terminator cyborg’s smooth visage. As Oculus did before, the scrappy eight-person team at Avegant is taking its impressive proof-of-concept to Kickstarter in hopes of funding a beta unit: $500 is the base level for a Glyph, and the project is set to go live on January 22nd. And this sentence — right here! — is where we’re gonna stop speaking about the Glyph as if it’s competing with the Oculus Rift. As Avegant’s CEO Ed Tang told us late last week: “We’re not trying to compete with Oculus.”

... AVEGANT GLYPH HOME THEATER HEADSET ... The home theater headset just got a name, and the first prototype looked an awful lot like what you’d see underneath a Terminator cyborg’s smooth visage. As Oculus did before, the scrappy eight-person team at Avegant is taking its impressive proof-of-concept to Kickstarter in hopes of funding a beta unit: $500 is the base level for a Glyph, and the project is set to go live on January 22nd. And this sentence — right here! — is where we’re gonna stop speaking about the Glyph as if it’s competing with the Oculus Rift. As Avegant’s CEO Ed Tang told us late last week: “We’re not trying to compete with Oculus.”

... AVEGANT GLYPH HOME THEATER HEADSET ... The home theater headset just got a name, and the first prototype looked an awful lot like what you’d see underneath a Terminator cyborg’s smooth visage. As Oculus did before, the scrappy eight-person team at Avegant is taking its impressive proof-of-concept to Kickstarter in hopes of funding a beta unit: $500 is the base level for a Glyph, and the project is set to go live on January 22nd. And this sentence — right here! — is where we’re gonna stop speaking about the Glyph as if it’s competing with the Oculus Rift. As Avegant’s CEO Ed Tang told us late last week: “We’re not trying to compete with Oculus.”

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... Nokia X Android platform the newest weapon in low-cost phone battle ... Nokia, soon to be acquired by Microsoft Corp, is turning to software created by arch-rival Google for a new line of phones it hopes will make it a late contender in the dynamic low-cost smartphone market. Its first models, Nokia X, X+ and XL, rely upon an open version of the Android mobile software system created by Google that has become the world's most popular software used in smartphones. The release of the phones just days before Nokia sells its handset business to Microsoft in a $7.2 billion deal, is an attempt to stay relevant in emerging markets, where low-cost Android phones are being snapped up by hundreds of millions of buyers.

... Nokia X Android platform the newest weapon in low-cost phone battle ... Nokia, soon to be acquired by Microsoft Corp, is turning to software created by arch-rival Google for a new line of phones it hopes will make it a late contender in the dynamic low-cost smartphone market. Its first models, Nokia X, X+ and XL, rely upon an open version of the Android mobile software system created by Google that has become the world's most popular software used in smartphones. The release of the phones just days before Nokia sells its handset business to Microsoft in a $7.2 billion deal, is an attempt to stay relevant in emerging markets, where low-cost Android phones are being snapped up by hundreds of millions of buyers.

... Nokia X Android platform the newest weapon in low-cost phone battle ... Nokia, soon to be acquired by Microsoft Corp, is turning to software created by arch-rival Google for a new line of phones it hopes will make it a late contender in the dynamic low-cost smartphone market. Its first models, Nokia X, X+ and XL, rely upon an open version of the Android mobile software system created by Google that has become the world's most popular software used in smartphones. The release of the phones just days before Nokia sells its handset business to Microsoft in a $7.2 billion deal, is an attempt to stay relevant in emerging markets, where low-cost Android phones are being snapped up by hundreds of millions of buyers.

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MIT Cheetah Robot Runs Fast, and Efficiently The Cheetah robot developed at MIT's Biomimetic Robotics Lab first grabbed our attention when the project was announced back in 2009. In the years that followed few details emerged about its progress, until finally in July 2012 the lab posted videos of the robot walking on YouTube. Now, at the IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA), the MIT team has shown its cheetah-inspired robot running at a respectable 22 km/h (13.7 mph). And more: the robot has an energy efficiency that rivals that of real running animals. That speed makes it the second fastest legged robot in the world, beaten only by Boston Dynamics' Cheetah (which can run twice as fast). The MIT Cheetah knocks the Planar Biped, developed at the MIT Leg Lab in 1989, which achieved 21 km/h (13 mph) down to third place. It's worth noting that both the MIT Cheetah and Boston Dynamics' Cheetah are attached to horizontal bars that constrain them along the sagittal plane (preventing roll and yaw movement). So, yeah, you might say that is cheeting, but hopefully we'll see these robots running free sometime in the future. Watch it running : http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=UBHJqnM8RTU

MIT Cheetah Robot Runs Fast, and Efficiently The Cheetah robot developed at MIT's Biomimetic Robotics Lab first grabbed our attention when the project was announced back in 2009. In the years that followed few details emerged about its progress, until finally in July 2012 the lab posted videos of the robot walking on YouTube. Now, at the IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA), the MIT team has shown its cheetah-inspired robot running at a respectable 22 km/h (13.7 mph). And more: the robot has an energy efficiency that rivals that of real running animals. That speed makes it the second fastest legged robot in the world, beaten only by Boston Dynamics' Cheetah (which can run twice as fast). The MIT Cheetah knocks the Planar Biped, developed at the MIT Leg Lab in 1989, which achieved 21 km/h (13 mph) down to third place. It's worth noting that both the MIT Cheetah and Boston Dynamics' Cheetah are attached to horizontal bars that constrain them along the sagittal plane (preventing roll and yaw movement). So, yeah, you might say that is cheeting, but hopefully we'll see these robots running free sometime in the future. Watch it running : http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=UBHJqnM8RTU

MIT Cheetah Robot Runs Fast, and Efficiently The Cheetah robot developed at MIT's Biomimetic Robotics Lab first grabbed our attention when the project was announced back in 2009. In the years that followed few details emerged about its progress, until finally in July 2012 the lab posted videos of the robot walking on YouTube. Now, at the IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA), the MIT team has shown its cheetah-inspired robot running at a respectable 22 km/h (13.7 mph). And more: the robot has an energy efficiency that rivals that of real running animals. That speed makes it the second fastest legged robot in the world, beaten only by Boston Dynamics' Cheetah (which can run twice as fast). The MIT Cheetah knocks the Planar Biped, developed at the MIT Leg Lab in 1989, which achieved 21 km/h (13 mph) down to third place. It's worth noting that both the MIT Cheetah and Boston Dynamics' Cheetah are attached to horizontal bars that constrain them along the sagittal plane (preventing roll and yaw movement). So, yeah, you might say that is cheeting, but hopefully we'll see these robots running free sometime in the future. Watch it running : http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=UBHJqnM8RTU

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2013 Invention Awards: Ballast Bulb A household lamp powered by a bag of rocks. More than 780 million people rely on kerosene to light their homes. But the fuel is pricey and is toxic when burned—not to mention a fire hazard. In 2008, London-based product designer Martin Riddiford and his colleague Jim Reeves decided to create a cheap, safe alternative. Riddiford knew a falling weight could produce enough energy to run a grandfather clock, so why not a light? To find out, he attached the crank of a wind-up flashlight to a bicycle wheel. He hung a weight from the wheel to cause it to spin; the wheel cranked the flashlight, and the device lit up. Over the next four years, Riddiford, Reeves, and a small team spent their downtime between projects in a basement, refining the GravityLight. To use it, a person hangs the device and fills an attached fabric bag with up to 28 pounds of rocks, dirt, or other material. Lifting and releasing the bag steadily pulls a notched belt through GravityLight’s plastic hub; the belt spins a series of gears to drive a small motor, which continuously powers an LED for about 30 minutes. The team used crowdfunding to manufacture 1,000 GravityLights, which it plans to send to developing countries for field testing—plus 6,000 more for backers. “It’s exciting to witness so much positive reaction to what we’re doing,” Riddiford says. Besides remote villages, the lamp could prove handy in campsites, closets, and any dark nook far from a socket, so Riddiford also hopes to license a retail version for less than $10. GravityLight: Graham Murdoch HOW IT WORKS 1) As a weighted bag descends, it tugs a belt to turn a series of plastic gears. 2) The gears work in unison to spin an electric motor. 3) The motor powers a small yet bright LED, providing continuous illumination for about 30 minutes—the maximum amount of time that the bag can take to descend. 4) External connectors can power low-voltage devices, and the entire system is designed to work for thousands of lift-and-drop cycles. INVENTORS : Jim Reeves, Martin Riddiford COMPANY : Therefore INVENTION : GravityLight

2013 Invention Awards: Ballast Bulb A household lamp powered by a bag of rocks. More than 780 million people rely on kerosene to light their homes. But the fuel is pricey and is toxic when burned—not to mention a fire hazard. In 2008, London-based product designer Martin Riddiford and his colleague Jim Reeves decided to create a cheap, safe alternative. Riddiford knew a falling weight could produce enough energy to run a grandfather clock, so why not a light? To find out, he attached the crank of a wind-up flashlight to a bicycle wheel. He hung a weight from the wheel to cause it to spin; the wheel cranked the flashlight, and the device lit up. Over the next four years, Riddiford, Reeves, and a small team spent their downtime between projects in a basement, refining the GravityLight. To use it, a person hangs the device and fills an attached fabric bag with up to 28 pounds of rocks, dirt, or other material. Lifting and releasing the bag steadily pulls a notched belt through GravityLight’s plastic hub; the belt spins a series of gears to drive a small motor, which continuously powers an LED for about 30 minutes. The team used crowdfunding to manufacture 1,000 GravityLights, which it plans to send to developing countries for field testing—plus 6,000 more for backers. “It’s exciting to witness so much positive reaction to what we’re doing,” Riddiford says. Besides remote villages, the lamp could prove handy in campsites, closets, and any dark nook far from a socket, so Riddiford also hopes to license a retail version for less than $10. GravityLight: Graham Murdoch HOW IT WORKS 1) As a weighted bag descends, it tugs a belt to turn a series of plastic gears. 2) The gears work in unison to spin an electric motor. 3) The motor powers a small yet bright LED, providing continuous illumination for about 30 minutes—the maximum amount of time that the bag can take to descend. 4) External connectors can power low-voltage devices, and the entire system is designed to work for thousands of lift-and-drop cycles. INVENTORS : Jim Reeves, Martin Riddiford COMPANY : Therefore INVENTION : GravityLight

2013 Invention Awards: Ballast Bulb A household lamp powered by a bag of rocks. More than 780 million people rely on kerosene to light their homes. But the fuel is pricey and is toxic when burned—not to mention a fire hazard. In 2008, London-based product designer Martin Riddiford and his colleague Jim Reeves decided to create a cheap, safe alternative. Riddiford knew a falling weight could produce enough energy to run a grandfather clock, so why not a light? To find out, he attached the crank of a wind-up flashlight to a bicycle wheel. He hung a weight from the wheel to cause it to spin; the wheel cranked the flashlight, and the device lit up. Over the next four years, Riddiford, Reeves, and a small team spent their downtime between projects in a basement, refining the GravityLight. To use it, a person hangs the device and fills an attached fabric bag with up to 28 pounds of rocks, dirt, or other material. Lifting and releasing the bag steadily pulls a notched belt through GravityLight’s plastic hub; the belt spins a series of gears to drive a small motor, which continuously powers an LED for about 30 minutes. The team used crowdfunding to manufacture 1,000 GravityLights, which it plans to send to developing countries for field testing—plus 6,000 more for backers. “It’s exciting to witness so much positive reaction to what we’re doing,” Riddiford says. Besides remote villages, the lamp could prove handy in campsites, closets, and any dark nook far from a socket, so Riddiford also hopes to license a retail version for less than $10. GravityLight: Graham Murdoch HOW IT WORKS 1) As a weighted bag descends, it tugs a belt to turn a series of plastic gears. 2) The gears work in unison to spin an electric motor. 3) The motor powers a small yet bright LED, providing continuous illumination for about 30 minutes—the maximum amount of time that the bag can take to descend. 4) External connectors can power low-voltage devices, and the entire system is designed to work for thousands of lift-and-drop cycles. INVENTORS : Jim Reeves, Martin Riddiford COMPANY : Therefore INVENTION : GravityLight

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:: Donut bike concept folds up for portability :: Bring the bike into the office and set it under your desk with this neat design. It is designed by Arvind M and will allow you to fold it up and carry it on the go just like a bag or briefcase. It looks like it folds up pretty easily. Hopefully they actually market this one at some point. It’s great for people who live in apartments and have no room to store typical bikes.

:: Donut bike concept folds up for portability :: Bring the bike into the office and set it under your desk with this neat design. It is designed by Arvind M and will allow you to fold it up and carry it on the go just like a bag or briefcase. It looks like it folds up pretty easily. Hopefully they actually market this one at some point. It’s great for people who live in apartments and have no room to store typical bikes.

:: Donut bike concept folds up for portability :: Bring the bike into the office and set it under your desk with this neat design. It is designed by Arvind M and will allow you to fold it up and carry it on the go just like a bag or briefcase. It looks like it folds up pretty easily. Hopefully they actually market this one at some point. It’s great for people who live in apartments and have no room to store typical bikes.

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