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India's own GPS module launched Read more: https://bit.ly/2O34dE9 #Business #Technology #Innovations #CompuBrain #Time #GPSModule #India #GPS #TechNews #UTraQ

India's own GPS module launched Read more: https://bit.ly/2O34dE9 #Business #Technology #Innovations #CompuBrain #Time #GPSModule #India #GPS #TechNews #UTraQ

India's own GPS module launched Read more: https://bit.ly/2O34dE9 #Business #Technology #Innovations #CompuBrain #Time #GPSModule #India #GPS #TechNews #UTraQ

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Renault's KWID Concept comes with its own Flying Companion quadcopter Unveiled at the New Delhi Auto Show, the KWID Concept was tailored to meet the needs of Indian drivers, with room for five-passengers and an interior designed to work better in warmer climates To the left of the steering wheel, an integrated console manages KWID’s unique selling proposition – the one of a kind built-in Flying Companion. The proprietary quadcopter, hidden beneath a rear pivoting roof section, is a world first feature that can be operated remotely from inside the cockpit. In automatic mode, the Flying Companion can be run through a programmed flying sequence using GPS coordinates, or in manual mode can be driven by passengers inside the car via an integrated tablet. Although what may appear gimmicky at first, the Flying Companion’s ability to scout traffic, road conditions, or surroundings while taking photographs makes it a viable idea for future designs.

Renault's KWID Concept comes with its own Flying Companion quadcopter Unveiled at the New Delhi Auto Show, the KWID Concept was tailored to meet the needs of Indian drivers, with room for five-passengers and an interior designed to work better in warmer climates To the left of the steering wheel, an integrated console manages KWID’s unique selling proposition – the one of a kind built-in Flying Companion. The proprietary quadcopter, hidden beneath a rear pivoting roof section, is a world first feature that can be operated remotely from inside the cockpit. In automatic mode, the Flying Companion can be run through a programmed flying sequence using GPS coordinates, or in manual mode can be driven by passengers inside the car via an integrated tablet. Although what may appear gimmicky at first, the Flying Companion’s ability to scout traffic, road conditions, or surroundings while taking photographs makes it a viable idea for future designs.

Renault's KWID Concept comes with its own Flying Companion quadcopter Unveiled at the New Delhi Auto Show, the KWID Concept was tailored to meet the needs of Indian drivers, with room for five-passengers and an interior designed to work better in warmer climates To the left of the steering wheel, an integrated console manages KWID’s unique selling proposition – the one of a kind built-in Flying Companion. The proprietary quadcopter, hidden beneath a rear pivoting roof section, is a world first feature that can be operated remotely from inside the cockpit. In automatic mode, the Flying Companion can be run through a programmed flying sequence using GPS coordinates, or in manual mode can be driven by passengers inside the car via an integrated tablet. Although what may appear gimmicky at first, the Flying Companion’s ability to scout traffic, road conditions, or surroundings while taking photographs makes it a viable idea for future designs.

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Nikon Unveils Android-Powered Camera in Coolpix Line - An Android-powered camera, the S800c comes with a 16-megapixel CMOS sensor, a 10x zoom lens, HD video recording, GPS and access to Android apps. The most exciting of these is the Coolpix S800c, which combines Nikon’s imaging technologies with built-in Wi-Fi and the Android OS, confirming earlier rumors that the company was working on an Android-powered camera. Calling it the “perfect camera for ‘connected’ individuals,” Nikon says the S800c allows for easy sharing of photos through social networks. It comes with a 16-megapixel CMOS sensor, a 10x zoom lens, HD video recording, GPS and access to Android apps.

Nikon Unveils Android-Powered Camera in Coolpix Line - An Android-powered camera, the S800c comes with a 16-megapixel CMOS sensor, a 10x zoom lens, HD video recording, GPS and access to Android apps. The most exciting of these is the Coolpix S800c, which combines Nikon’s imaging technologies with built-in Wi-Fi and the Android OS, confirming earlier rumors that the company was working on an Android-powered camera. Calling it the “perfect camera for ‘connected’ individuals,” Nikon says the S800c allows for easy sharing of photos through social networks. It comes with a 16-megapixel CMOS sensor, a 10x zoom lens, HD video recording, GPS and access to Android apps.

Nikon Unveils Android-Powered Camera in Coolpix Line - An Android-powered camera, the S800c comes with a 16-megapixel CMOS sensor, a 10x zoom lens, HD video recording, GPS and access to Android apps. The most exciting of these is the Coolpix S800c, which combines Nikon’s imaging technologies with built-in Wi-Fi and the Android OS, confirming earlier rumors that the company was working on an Android-powered camera. Calling it the “perfect camera for ‘connected’ individuals,” Nikon says the S800c allows for easy sharing of photos through social networks. It comes with a 16-megapixel CMOS sensor, a 10x zoom lens, HD video recording, GPS and access to Android apps.

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:: Iridium Extreme satellite phone on KDDI, comes with GPS :: KDDI’s release of the Iridium Extreme satellite phone that will also carry GPS functionality – the first of its kind to do so.Thanks to the introduction of GPS functionality, Extreme users will be able to update people in their address book from time to time regarding their location over email. Just in case there is an emergency, you can just push the SOS Button located at the top of the unit in order to send an automatic message which relays where your GPS position is. The Iridium Extreme is definitely not a looker at all where mobile phones are concerned, but when you compared it to its predecessor, the 9555, this is a beauty, having shed 7% of its weight and is 10% lighter, making it the thinnest, lightest Iridium satphone to date. Not only that, its durability has been enhanced thanks to better resistance to water and dust.

:: Iridium Extreme satellite phone on KDDI, comes with GPS :: KDDI’s release of the Iridium Extreme satellite phone that will also carry GPS functionality – the first of its kind to do so.Thanks to the introduction of GPS functionality, Extreme users will be able to update people in their address book from time to time regarding their location over email. Just in case there is an emergency, you can just push the SOS Button located at the top of the unit in order to send an automatic message which relays where your GPS position is. The Iridium Extreme is definitely not a looker at all where mobile phones are concerned, but when you compared it to its predecessor, the 9555, this is a beauty, having shed 7% of its weight and is 10% lighter, making it the thinnest, lightest Iridium satphone to date. Not only that, its durability has been enhanced thanks to better resistance to water and dust.

:: Iridium Extreme satellite phone on KDDI, comes with GPS :: KDDI’s release of the Iridium Extreme satellite phone that will also carry GPS functionality – the first of its kind to do so.Thanks to the introduction of GPS functionality, Extreme users will be able to update people in their address book from time to time regarding their location over email. Just in case there is an emergency, you can just push the SOS Button located at the top of the unit in order to send an automatic message which relays where your GPS position is. The Iridium Extreme is definitely not a looker at all where mobile phones are concerned, but when you compared it to its predecessor, the 9555, this is a beauty, having shed 7% of its weight and is 10% lighter, making it the thinnest, lightest Iridium satphone to date. Not only that, its durability has been enhanced thanks to better resistance to water and dust.

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:: Watch The Future, Smartphone Wrist Control Concept :: A new watch concept has been created by F.Bertrand called the “Watch The Future”, which has been designed to enable you to link to application on your smartphone. Enabling you to control and receive updates directly on your wrist. The “Watch The Future” concept wrist watch can display the weather, your contacts, stock exchange information, SMS messages, Facebook updates, your GPS location and more. As well as keeping you update-to-date with the current time. The innovative watch concept would keep the application you use most at easy access, and would even change the icons location on the strap according to the position of your wrist. Other options that would be available to add to the watch include the possibility to track your pulse and even your emotions. It even enables you to keep track of your phone by ring it when you can’t quite remember where you put it. Unfortunately due to the watch being just a concept don’t expect it to arrive in stores soon. But do expect the technology to start to making its way to wrist style devices over the coming years, allowing you to interact with your smartphone in new and exiting ways.

:: Watch The Future, Smartphone Wrist Control Concept :: A new watch concept has been created by F.Bertrand called the “Watch The Future”, which has been designed to enable you to link to application on your smartphone. Enabling you to control and receive updates directly on your wrist. The “Watch The Future” concept wrist watch can display the weather, your contacts, stock exchange information, SMS messages, Facebook updates, your GPS location and more. As well as keeping you update-to-date with the current time. The innovative watch concept would keep the application you use most at easy access, and would even change the icons location on the strap according to the position of your wrist. Other options that would be available to add to the watch include the possibility to track your pulse and even your emotions. It even enables you to keep track of your phone by ring it when you can’t quite remember where you put it. Unfortunately due to the watch being just a concept don’t expect it to arrive in stores soon. But do expect the technology to start to making its way to wrist style devices over the coming years, allowing you to interact with your smartphone in new and exiting ways.

:: Watch The Future, Smartphone Wrist Control Concept :: A new watch concept has been created by F.Bertrand called the “Watch The Future”, which has been designed to enable you to link to application on your smartphone. Enabling you to control and receive updates directly on your wrist. The “Watch The Future” concept wrist watch can display the weather, your contacts, stock exchange information, SMS messages, Facebook updates, your GPS location and more. As well as keeping you update-to-date with the current time. The innovative watch concept would keep the application you use most at easy access, and would even change the icons location on the strap according to the position of your wrist. Other options that would be available to add to the watch include the possibility to track your pulse and even your emotions. It even enables you to keep track of your phone by ring it when you can’t quite remember where you put it. Unfortunately due to the watch being just a concept don’t expect it to arrive in stores soon. But do expect the technology to start to making its way to wrist style devices over the coming years, allowing you to interact with your smartphone in new and exiting ways.

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:: Why investing in personal navigation device a good idea :: Asking for directions may be difficult when you are in an area where the landmarks and language are unfamiliar. This is why personal navigation devices, or PNDs, as they are commonly referred to, are becoming an integral part of the mobile executives' digital arsenal. Why can't you simply use the GPS-enabled smartphone? The idea of investing in a PND might seem extravagant to many people, given that today almost every mid-segment smartphone and tablet in the market comes with GPS connectivity and built-in maps or navigation of some sort. For late initiates to the navigation tech, GPS stands for global positioning system, which helps pinpoint your location by using special satellite connections. If your device also has a map, GPS can show you exactly where you are. In case your system has a navigation software, the gadget will even help you plot your route from one place to another, complete with turn-by-turn instructions through voice and/or text. While most smartphones and tablets can help navigate and chart routes, saving you the need to purchase and carry an extra gadget, they have their limitations. For one, they are not designed solely for navigation, so your routing experience could be disturbed by incoming calls, texts or e-mails. Secondly, neither the speaker system nor the display on a handset is meant to help you find your way. There's also the issue of the battery draining out fast when you have the GPS running. Add to these the fact that most smartphones depend to an extent on mobile network connectivity to pinpoint your location (via A-GPS or assisted GPS). This effectively limits you to areas that are supported by a particular operator, while adding to your data usage bill. These are the various reasons why relying solely on a handset or tablet to find your way might not be the best option. The PND edge The PNDs easily score over smartphones since most of these sport relatively large displays (3.5 inch and above) and come with speakers that are louder than those of most handsets. What's more, they do not rely on a mobile network or Wi-Fi to pinpoint your location, so you can use them virtually anywhere without worrying about picking up data charges. These devices also tend to handle navigation extremely smoothly as they have been designed solely for this purpose. You can simply switch on a PND, indicate where you want to go and follow the route and instructions it gives. Almost all of them come with voice navigation. Unlike phones and tablets, most PNDs do not run multiple applications, so battery life and speed of operation (in navigation mode) are significantly better. Of course, they have their drawbacks. As there is no Internet connectivity built into most PNDs, you have to connect the device to a computer to get new maps when they are updated. This can be cumbersome and time-consuming, especially if you have a slow Net connection. However, it is not advisable to skip this exercise, especially in a country like India, where roads and routes change, new landmarks emerge and old ones disappear very frequently. This brings us to another shortcoming. As these devices depend on maps that are pre-installed and have to be updated manually, their utility is limited when it comes to discovering new routes or spotting new landmarks. Source :- Gesia

:: Why investing in personal navigation device a good idea :: Asking for directions may be difficult when you are in an area where the landmarks and language are unfamiliar. This is why personal navigation devices, or PNDs, as they are commonly referred to, are becoming an integral part of the mobile executives' digital arsenal. Why can't you simply use the GPS-enabled smartphone? The idea of investing in a PND might seem extravagant to many people, given that today almost every mid-segment smartphone and tablet in the market comes with GPS connectivity and built-in maps or navigation of some sort. For late initiates to the navigation tech, GPS stands for global positioning system, which helps pinpoint your location by using special satellite connections. If your device also has a map, GPS can show you exactly where you are. In case your system has a navigation software, the gadget will even help you plot your route from one place to another, complete with turn-by-turn instructions through voice and/or text. While most smartphones and tablets can help navigate and chart routes, saving you the need to purchase and carry an extra gadget, they have their limitations. For one, they are not designed solely for navigation, so your routing experience could be disturbed by incoming calls, texts or e-mails. Secondly, neither the speaker system nor the display on a handset is meant to help you find your way. There's also the issue of the battery draining out fast when you have the GPS running. Add to these the fact that most smartphones depend to an extent on mobile network connectivity to pinpoint your location (via A-GPS or assisted GPS). This effectively limits you to areas that are supported by a particular operator, while adding to your data usage bill. These are the various reasons why relying solely on a handset or tablet to find your way might not be the best option. The PND edge The PNDs easily score over smartphones since most of these sport relatively large displays (3.5 inch and above) and come with speakers that are louder than those of most handsets. What's more, they do not rely on a mobile network or Wi-Fi to pinpoint your location, so you can use them virtually anywhere without worrying about picking up data charges. These devices also tend to handle navigation extremely smoothly as they have been designed solely for this purpose. You can simply switch on a PND, indicate where you want to go and follow the route and instructions it gives. Almost all of them come with voice navigation. Unlike phones and tablets, most PNDs do not run multiple applications, so battery life and speed of operation (in navigation mode) are significantly better. Of course, they have their drawbacks. As there is no Internet connectivity built into most PNDs, you have to connect the device to a computer to get new maps when they are updated. This can be cumbersome and time-consuming, especially if you have a slow Net connection. However, it is not advisable to skip this exercise, especially in a country like India, where roads and routes change, new landmarks emerge and old ones disappear very frequently. This brings us to another shortcoming. As these devices depend on maps that are pre-installed and have to be updated manually, their utility is limited when it comes to discovering new routes or spotting new landmarks. Source :- Gesia

:: Why investing in personal navigation device a good idea :: Asking for directions may be difficult when you are in an area where the landmarks and language are unfamiliar. This is why personal navigation devices, or PNDs, as they are commonly referred to, are becoming an integral part of the mobile executives' digital arsenal. Why can't you simply use the GPS-enabled smartphone? The idea of investing in a PND might seem extravagant to many people, given that today almost every mid-segment smartphone and tablet in the market comes with GPS connectivity and built-in maps or navigation of some sort. For late initiates to the navigation tech, GPS stands for global positioning system, which helps pinpoint your location by using special satellite connections. If your device also has a map, GPS can show you exactly where you are. In case your system has a navigation software, the gadget will even help you plot your route from one place to another, complete with turn-by-turn instructions through voice and/or text. While most smartphones and tablets can help navigate and chart routes, saving you the need to purchase and carry an extra gadget, they have their limitations. For one, they are not designed solely for navigation, so your routing experience could be disturbed by incoming calls, texts or e-mails. Secondly, neither the speaker system nor the display on a handset is meant to help you find your way. There's also the issue of the battery draining out fast when you have the GPS running. Add to these the fact that most smartphones depend to an extent on mobile network connectivity to pinpoint your location (via A-GPS or assisted GPS). This effectively limits you to areas that are supported by a particular operator, while adding to your data usage bill. These are the various reasons why relying solely on a handset or tablet to find your way might not be the best option. The PND edge The PNDs easily score over smartphones since most of these sport relatively large displays (3.5 inch and above) and come with speakers that are louder than those of most handsets. What's more, they do not rely on a mobile network or Wi-Fi to pinpoint your location, so you can use them virtually anywhere without worrying about picking up data charges. These devices also tend to handle navigation extremely smoothly as they have been designed solely for this purpose. You can simply switch on a PND, indicate where you want to go and follow the route and instructions it gives. Almost all of them come with voice navigation. Unlike phones and tablets, most PNDs do not run multiple applications, so battery life and speed of operation (in navigation mode) are significantly better. Of course, they have their drawbacks. As there is no Internet connectivity built into most PNDs, you have to connect the device to a computer to get new maps when they are updated. This can be cumbersome and time-consuming, especially if you have a slow Net connection. However, it is not advisable to skip this exercise, especially in a country like India, where roads and routes change, new landmarks emerge and old ones disappear very frequently. This brings us to another shortcoming. As these devices depend on maps that are pre-installed and have to be updated manually, their utility is limited when it comes to discovering new routes or spotting new landmarks. Source :- Gesia

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:: Google Augmented Reality Glasses Arriving Soon!! :: The 9to5 Google website has revealed this week that Google’s new augmented reality glasses could be arriving very soon. Providing users that wear the new “Google Goggles” as they have been dubbed. Information as they walk along provided by Google location services and Google’s stored information. A source has now revealed to the 9to5Google website that the new Google glasses look similar to Oakleys Thumps glasses and are equipped with a front a facing camera. Inside the glass lens there will be a heads up display (HUD) which is located in front of one eye and provides relevant information at your current location. The source also suggests that the I/O on the glasses will also include voice input and output, and hardware is near the equivalent of a generation-old Android smartphone, with CPU, Memory and storage provided onboard the glasses. “They are in late prototype stages of wearable glasses that look similar to thick-rimmed glasses that “normal people” wear. However, these provide a display with a heads up computer interface. There are a few buttons on the arms of the glasses, but otherwise, they could be mistaken for normal glasses. Additionally, we are not sure of the technology being employed here, but it is likely a transparent LCD or AMOLED display such as the one demonstrated below: In addition, we have heard that this device is not an “Android peripheral” as the NYT stated. According to our source, it communicates directly with the Cloud over IP. Although, the “Google Goggles” could use a phone’s Internet connection, through Wi-Fi or a low power Bluetooth 4.0. The use-case is augmented reality that would tie into Google’s location services. A user can walk around with information popping up and into display based on preferences, location and Google’s information. Therefore, these things likely connect to the Internet and have GPS. They also likely run a version of Android.”Unfortunately no information on pricing or worldwide availability has been released as yet. Source:- Geeky-gadgets

:: Google Augmented Reality Glasses Arriving Soon!! :: The 9to5 Google website has revealed this week that Google’s new augmented reality glasses could be arriving very soon. Providing users that wear the new “Google Goggles” as they have been dubbed. Information as they walk along provided by Google location services and Google’s stored information. A source has now revealed to the 9to5Google website that the new Google glasses look similar to Oakleys Thumps glasses and are equipped with a front a facing camera. Inside the glass lens there will be a heads up display (HUD) which is located in front of one eye and provides relevant information at your current location. The source also suggests that the I/O on the glasses will also include voice input and output, and hardware is near the equivalent of a generation-old Android smartphone, with CPU, Memory and storage provided onboard the glasses. “They are in late prototype stages of wearable glasses that look similar to thick-rimmed glasses that “normal people” wear. However, these provide a display with a heads up computer interface. There are a few buttons on the arms of the glasses, but otherwise, they could be mistaken for normal glasses. Additionally, we are not sure of the technology being employed here, but it is likely a transparent LCD or AMOLED display such as the one demonstrated below: In addition, we have heard that this device is not an “Android peripheral” as the NYT stated. According to our source, it communicates directly with the Cloud over IP. Although, the “Google Goggles” could use a phone’s Internet connection, through Wi-Fi or a low power Bluetooth 4.0. The use-case is augmented reality that would tie into Google’s location services. A user can walk around with information popping up and into display based on preferences, location and Google’s information. Therefore, these things likely connect to the Internet and have GPS. They also likely run a version of Android.”Unfortunately no information on pricing or worldwide availability has been released as yet. Source:- Geeky-gadgets

:: Google Augmented Reality Glasses Arriving Soon!! :: The 9to5 Google website has revealed this week that Google’s new augmented reality glasses could be arriving very soon. Providing users that wear the new “Google Goggles” as they have been dubbed. Information as they walk along provided by Google location services and Google’s stored information. A source has now revealed to the 9to5Google website that the new Google glasses look similar to Oakleys Thumps glasses and are equipped with a front a facing camera. Inside the glass lens there will be a heads up display (HUD) which is located in front of one eye and provides relevant information at your current location. The source also suggests that the I/O on the glasses will also include voice input and output, and hardware is near the equivalent of a generation-old Android smartphone, with CPU, Memory and storage provided onboard the glasses. “They are in late prototype stages of wearable glasses that look similar to thick-rimmed glasses that “normal people” wear. However, these provide a display with a heads up computer interface. There are a few buttons on the arms of the glasses, but otherwise, they could be mistaken for normal glasses. Additionally, we are not sure of the technology being employed here, but it is likely a transparent LCD or AMOLED display such as the one demonstrated below: In addition, we have heard that this device is not an “Android peripheral” as the NYT stated. According to our source, it communicates directly with the Cloud over IP. Although, the “Google Goggles” could use a phone’s Internet connection, through Wi-Fi or a low power Bluetooth 4.0. The use-case is augmented reality that would tie into Google’s location services. A user can walk around with information popping up and into display based on preferences, location and Google’s information. Therefore, these things likely connect to the Internet and have GPS. They also likely run a version of Android.”Unfortunately no information on pricing or worldwide availability has been released as yet. Source:- Geeky-gadgets

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Walk to Charge your Cell Phone Charge your Cell Phones by wearing these special shoes, developed by Tom Krupenkin and J. Ashley Taylor at the University of Wisconsin Madison. The mechanical energy is converted to electrical energy by using a micro-fluid based device, consisting of thousands of liquid micro-droplets interacting with a nano-structured substrate. Placed in a shoe, the device captures the energy of moving micro droplets and converts it into electrical current. There is enough power, according to the researchers, to charge a standard mobile phone or laptop. Getting the energy from the device to the handset presents another challenge. One way is to plug a USB cable into the shoe – probably not the most practical option. There are a lot of places where this kind of power would be useful. The military could put it in boots and cut way back on the number of batteries a typical soldier has to carry. Right now they have to walk around with up to 20 pounds worth to power various electronic devices such as night vision goggles, laptops and GPS units. If nothing else, this method of powering phones might end up encouraging more people to exercise. And think of the possibilities if you run marathons. Another solution would be to use the power-excavating shoe as an intermediary between cell phone towers and your phone, like a long-distance radio. As searching for a signal is a huge drain on a phone’s power, Krupenkin said this method is a huge energy saver and could make your phone’s battery last as much as 10 times longer. Source: technodiscoveries.com

Walk to Charge your Cell Phone Charge your Cell Phones by wearing these special shoes, developed by Tom Krupenkin and J. Ashley Taylor at the University of Wisconsin Madison. The mechanical energy is converted to electrical energy by using a micro-fluid based device, consisting of thousands of liquid micro-droplets interacting with a nano-structured substrate. Placed in a shoe, the device captures the energy of moving micro droplets and converts it into electrical current. There is enough power, according to the researchers, to charge a standard mobile phone or laptop. Getting the energy from the device to the handset presents another challenge. One way is to plug a USB cable into the shoe – probably not the most practical option. There are a lot of places where this kind of power would be useful. The military could put it in boots and cut way back on the number of batteries a typical soldier has to carry. Right now they have to walk around with up to 20 pounds worth to power various electronic devices such as night vision goggles, laptops and GPS units. If nothing else, this method of powering phones might end up encouraging more people to exercise. And think of the possibilities if you run marathons. Another solution would be to use the power-excavating shoe as an intermediary between cell phone towers and your phone, like a long-distance radio. As searching for a signal is a huge drain on a phone’s power, Krupenkin said this method is a huge energy saver and could make your phone’s battery last as much as 10 times longer. Source: technodiscoveries.com

Walk to Charge your Cell Phone Charge your Cell Phones by wearing these special shoes, developed by Tom Krupenkin and J. Ashley Taylor at the University of Wisconsin Madison. The mechanical energy is converted to electrical energy by using a micro-fluid based device, consisting of thousands of liquid micro-droplets interacting with a nano-structured substrate. Placed in a shoe, the device captures the energy of moving micro droplets and converts it into electrical current. There is enough power, according to the researchers, to charge a standard mobile phone or laptop. Getting the energy from the device to the handset presents another challenge. One way is to plug a USB cable into the shoe – probably not the most practical option. There are a lot of places where this kind of power would be useful. The military could put it in boots and cut way back on the number of batteries a typical soldier has to carry. Right now they have to walk around with up to 20 pounds worth to power various electronic devices such as night vision goggles, laptops and GPS units. If nothing else, this method of powering phones might end up encouraging more people to exercise. And think of the possibilities if you run marathons. Another solution would be to use the power-excavating shoe as an intermediary between cell phone towers and your phone, like a long-distance radio. As searching for a signal is a huge drain on a phone’s power, Krupenkin said this method is a huge energy saver and could make your phone’s battery last as much as 10 times longer. Source: technodiscoveries.com

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