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... New Downdraft Tower Could Revolutionize Wind Power ... A revolutionary new clean energy technology is getting set to change the way we think about wind power. The Solar Wind Downdraft Tower, created by Maryland-based Solar Wind Energy Inc. turns the traditional wind turbine design on its head by putting turbines at the base of a tubular tower that generates its own wind throughout the year. How does it work? Read on. A tower at the center of the system creates a downdraft by using a series of pumps to carry water to the top of the 2,250-foot structure. Once the water has reached the top, it’s distributed as a fine mist across the opening, according to Gizmag. The mist evaporates and is absorbed by hot, dry air – which makes the air cooler, denser and heavier than the warmer air outside the tower. The cooled air then falls through the hollow tower at speeds up to 50 mph (80 km/h) and is directed through tunnels where it turns turbines housed inside them. One downside to the system is that it requires a lot of water to operate, but it does capture and recirculate excess water from the generation process.

... New Downdraft Tower Could Revolutionize Wind Power ... A revolutionary new clean energy technology is getting set to change the way we think about wind power. The Solar Wind Downdraft Tower, created by Maryland-based Solar Wind Energy Inc. turns the traditional wind turbine design on its head by putting turbines at the base of a tubular tower that generates its own wind throughout the year. How does it work? Read on. A tower at the center of the system creates a downdraft by using a series of pumps to carry water to the top of the 2,250-foot structure. Once the water has reached the top, it’s distributed as a fine mist across the opening, according to Gizmag. The mist evaporates and is absorbed by hot, dry air – which makes the air cooler, denser and heavier than the warmer air outside the tower. The cooled air then falls through the hollow tower at speeds up to 50 mph (80 km/h) and is directed through tunnels where it turns turbines housed inside them. One downside to the system is that it requires a lot of water to operate, but it does capture and recirculate excess water from the generation process.

... New Downdraft Tower Could Revolutionize Wind Power ... A revolutionary new clean energy technology is getting set to change the way we think about wind power. The Solar Wind Downdraft Tower, created by Maryland-based Solar Wind Energy Inc. turns the traditional wind turbine design on its head by putting turbines at the base of a tubular tower that generates its own wind throughout the year. How does it work? Read on. A tower at the center of the system creates a downdraft by using a series of pumps to carry water to the top of the 2,250-foot structure. Once the water has reached the top, it’s distributed as a fine mist across the opening, according to Gizmag. The mist evaporates and is absorbed by hot, dry air – which makes the air cooler, denser and heavier than the warmer air outside the tower. The cooled air then falls through the hollow tower at speeds up to 50 mph (80 km/h) and is directed through tunnels where it turns turbines housed inside them. One downside to the system is that it requires a lot of water to operate, but it does capture and recirculate excess water from the generation process.

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MIT Cheetah Robot Runs Fast, and Efficiently The Cheetah robot developed at MIT's Biomimetic Robotics Lab first grabbed our attention when the project was announced back in 2009. In the years that followed few details emerged about its progress, until finally in July 2012 the lab posted videos of the robot walking on YouTube. Now, at the IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA), the MIT team has shown its cheetah-inspired robot running at a respectable 22 km/h (13.7 mph). And more: the robot has an energy efficiency that rivals that of real running animals. That speed makes it the second fastest legged robot in the world, beaten only by Boston Dynamics' Cheetah (which can run twice as fast). The MIT Cheetah knocks the Planar Biped, developed at the MIT Leg Lab in 1989, which achieved 21 km/h (13 mph) down to third place. It's worth noting that both the MIT Cheetah and Boston Dynamics' Cheetah are attached to horizontal bars that constrain them along the sagittal plane (preventing roll and yaw movement). So, yeah, you might say that is cheeting, but hopefully we'll see these robots running free sometime in the future. Watch it running : http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=UBHJqnM8RTU

MIT Cheetah Robot Runs Fast, and Efficiently The Cheetah robot developed at MIT's Biomimetic Robotics Lab first grabbed our attention when the project was announced back in 2009. In the years that followed few details emerged about its progress, until finally in July 2012 the lab posted videos of the robot walking on YouTube. Now, at the IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA), the MIT team has shown its cheetah-inspired robot running at a respectable 22 km/h (13.7 mph). And more: the robot has an energy efficiency that rivals that of real running animals. That speed makes it the second fastest legged robot in the world, beaten only by Boston Dynamics' Cheetah (which can run twice as fast). The MIT Cheetah knocks the Planar Biped, developed at the MIT Leg Lab in 1989, which achieved 21 km/h (13 mph) down to third place. It's worth noting that both the MIT Cheetah and Boston Dynamics' Cheetah are attached to horizontal bars that constrain them along the sagittal plane (preventing roll and yaw movement). So, yeah, you might say that is cheeting, but hopefully we'll see these robots running free sometime in the future. Watch it running : http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=UBHJqnM8RTU

MIT Cheetah Robot Runs Fast, and Efficiently The Cheetah robot developed at MIT's Biomimetic Robotics Lab first grabbed our attention when the project was announced back in 2009. In the years that followed few details emerged about its progress, until finally in July 2012 the lab posted videos of the robot walking on YouTube. Now, at the IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA), the MIT team has shown its cheetah-inspired robot running at a respectable 22 km/h (13.7 mph). And more: the robot has an energy efficiency that rivals that of real running animals. That speed makes it the second fastest legged robot in the world, beaten only by Boston Dynamics' Cheetah (which can run twice as fast). The MIT Cheetah knocks the Planar Biped, developed at the MIT Leg Lab in 1989, which achieved 21 km/h (13 mph) down to third place. It's worth noting that both the MIT Cheetah and Boston Dynamics' Cheetah are attached to horizontal bars that constrain them along the sagittal plane (preventing roll and yaw movement). So, yeah, you might say that is cheeting, but hopefully we'll see these robots running free sometime in the future. Watch it running : http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=UBHJqnM8RTU

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2013 Invention Awards: Ballast Bulb A household lamp powered by a bag of rocks. More than 780 million people rely on kerosene to light their homes. But the fuel is pricey and is toxic when burned—not to mention a fire hazard. In 2008, London-based product designer Martin Riddiford and his colleague Jim Reeves decided to create a cheap, safe alternative. Riddiford knew a falling weight could produce enough energy to run a grandfather clock, so why not a light? To find out, he attached the crank of a wind-up flashlight to a bicycle wheel. He hung a weight from the wheel to cause it to spin; the wheel cranked the flashlight, and the device lit up. Over the next four years, Riddiford, Reeves, and a small team spent their downtime between projects in a basement, refining the GravityLight. To use it, a person hangs the device and fills an attached fabric bag with up to 28 pounds of rocks, dirt, or other material. Lifting and releasing the bag steadily pulls a notched belt through GravityLight’s plastic hub; the belt spins a series of gears to drive a small motor, which continuously powers an LED for about 30 minutes. The team used crowdfunding to manufacture 1,000 GravityLights, which it plans to send to developing countries for field testing—plus 6,000 more for backers. “It’s exciting to witness so much positive reaction to what we’re doing,” Riddiford says. Besides remote villages, the lamp could prove handy in campsites, closets, and any dark nook far from a socket, so Riddiford also hopes to license a retail version for less than $10. GravityLight: Graham Murdoch HOW IT WORKS 1) As a weighted bag descends, it tugs a belt to turn a series of plastic gears. 2) The gears work in unison to spin an electric motor. 3) The motor powers a small yet bright LED, providing continuous illumination for about 30 minutes—the maximum amount of time that the bag can take to descend. 4) External connectors can power low-voltage devices, and the entire system is designed to work for thousands of lift-and-drop cycles. INVENTORS : Jim Reeves, Martin Riddiford COMPANY : Therefore INVENTION : GravityLight

2013 Invention Awards: Ballast Bulb A household lamp powered by a bag of rocks. More than 780 million people rely on kerosene to light their homes. But the fuel is pricey and is toxic when burned—not to mention a fire hazard. In 2008, London-based product designer Martin Riddiford and his colleague Jim Reeves decided to create a cheap, safe alternative. Riddiford knew a falling weight could produce enough energy to run a grandfather clock, so why not a light? To find out, he attached the crank of a wind-up flashlight to a bicycle wheel. He hung a weight from the wheel to cause it to spin; the wheel cranked the flashlight, and the device lit up. Over the next four years, Riddiford, Reeves, and a small team spent their downtime between projects in a basement, refining the GravityLight. To use it, a person hangs the device and fills an attached fabric bag with up to 28 pounds of rocks, dirt, or other material. Lifting and releasing the bag steadily pulls a notched belt through GravityLight’s plastic hub; the belt spins a series of gears to drive a small motor, which continuously powers an LED for about 30 minutes. The team used crowdfunding to manufacture 1,000 GravityLights, which it plans to send to developing countries for field testing—plus 6,000 more for backers. “It’s exciting to witness so much positive reaction to what we’re doing,” Riddiford says. Besides remote villages, the lamp could prove handy in campsites, closets, and any dark nook far from a socket, so Riddiford also hopes to license a retail version for less than $10. GravityLight: Graham Murdoch HOW IT WORKS 1) As a weighted bag descends, it tugs a belt to turn a series of plastic gears. 2) The gears work in unison to spin an electric motor. 3) The motor powers a small yet bright LED, providing continuous illumination for about 30 minutes—the maximum amount of time that the bag can take to descend. 4) External connectors can power low-voltage devices, and the entire system is designed to work for thousands of lift-and-drop cycles. INVENTORS : Jim Reeves, Martin Riddiford COMPANY : Therefore INVENTION : GravityLight

2013 Invention Awards: Ballast Bulb A household lamp powered by a bag of rocks. More than 780 million people rely on kerosene to light their homes. But the fuel is pricey and is toxic when burned—not to mention a fire hazard. In 2008, London-based product designer Martin Riddiford and his colleague Jim Reeves decided to create a cheap, safe alternative. Riddiford knew a falling weight could produce enough energy to run a grandfather clock, so why not a light? To find out, he attached the crank of a wind-up flashlight to a bicycle wheel. He hung a weight from the wheel to cause it to spin; the wheel cranked the flashlight, and the device lit up. Over the next four years, Riddiford, Reeves, and a small team spent their downtime between projects in a basement, refining the GravityLight. To use it, a person hangs the device and fills an attached fabric bag with up to 28 pounds of rocks, dirt, or other material. Lifting and releasing the bag steadily pulls a notched belt through GravityLight’s plastic hub; the belt spins a series of gears to drive a small motor, which continuously powers an LED for about 30 minutes. The team used crowdfunding to manufacture 1,000 GravityLights, which it plans to send to developing countries for field testing—plus 6,000 more for backers. “It’s exciting to witness so much positive reaction to what we’re doing,” Riddiford says. Besides remote villages, the lamp could prove handy in campsites, closets, and any dark nook far from a socket, so Riddiford also hopes to license a retail version for less than $10. GravityLight: Graham Murdoch HOW IT WORKS 1) As a weighted bag descends, it tugs a belt to turn a series of plastic gears. 2) The gears work in unison to spin an electric motor. 3) The motor powers a small yet bright LED, providing continuous illumination for about 30 minutes—the maximum amount of time that the bag can take to descend. 4) External connectors can power low-voltage devices, and the entire system is designed to work for thousands of lift-and-drop cycles. INVENTORS : Jim Reeves, Martin Riddiford COMPANY : Therefore INVENTION : GravityLight

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:: KudoCase will keep your iPad charged via solar energy :: If you’ve always wanted an iPad case that could power your device using solar energy, the folks at Wireless NRG have released a solar-powered iPad case dubbed the KudoCase. If the accompanying image above did not already give it away, the KudoCase is a case for the iPad that comes with solar panels installed on the front. The solar panels will then be able to store energy from both indoor and outdoor light sources which in turn will charge the case’s built-in battery. The battery is then used to power your iPad. Assuming you are able to constantly charge the case itself, in theory we guess you’d never have to plug your iPad into a wall socket or to your computer if you wish to charge the device. Alternatively the case also comes with a USB port that you can use to charge another device (like your iPhone) by plugging in the USB cable.

:: KudoCase will keep your iPad charged via solar energy :: If you’ve always wanted an iPad case that could power your device using solar energy, the folks at Wireless NRG have released a solar-powered iPad case dubbed the KudoCase. If the accompanying image above did not already give it away, the KudoCase is a case for the iPad that comes with solar panels installed on the front. The solar panels will then be able to store energy from both indoor and outdoor light sources which in turn will charge the case’s built-in battery. The battery is then used to power your iPad. Assuming you are able to constantly charge the case itself, in theory we guess you’d never have to plug your iPad into a wall socket or to your computer if you wish to charge the device. Alternatively the case also comes with a USB port that you can use to charge another device (like your iPhone) by plugging in the USB cable.

:: KudoCase will keep your iPad charged via solar energy :: If you’ve always wanted an iPad case that could power your device using solar energy, the folks at Wireless NRG have released a solar-powered iPad case dubbed the KudoCase. If the accompanying image above did not already give it away, the KudoCase is a case for the iPad that comes with solar panels installed on the front. The solar panels will then be able to store energy from both indoor and outdoor light sources which in turn will charge the case’s built-in battery. The battery is then used to power your iPad. Assuming you are able to constantly charge the case itself, in theory we guess you’d never have to plug your iPad into a wall socket or to your computer if you wish to charge the device. Alternatively the case also comes with a USB port that you can use to charge another device (like your iPhone) by plugging in the USB cable.

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Apparently the average home has 40 devices plugged in drawing constant energy, even when they're turned off (this is called, creepily, 'vampire energy'). To combat this, Belkin has created a slew of products, in their 'conserve' line, that help consumers track, monitor and control energy use in their home. Here's the Conserve Socket, which turns off automatically after 30 minutes, three hours, or six hours of use.

Apparently the average home has 40 devices plugged in drawing constant energy, even when they're turned off (this is called, creepily, 'vampire energy'). To combat this, Belkin has created a slew of products, in their 'conserve' line, that help consumers track, monitor and control energy use in their home. Here's the Conserve Socket, which turns off automatically after 30 minutes, three hours, or six hours of use.

Apparently the average home has 40 devices plugged in drawing constant energy, even when they're turned off (this is called, creepily, 'vampire energy'). To combat this, Belkin has created a slew of products, in their 'conserve' line, that help consumers track, monitor and control energy use in their home. Here's the Conserve Socket, which turns off automatically after 30 minutes, three hours, or six hours of use.

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Walk to Charge your Cell Phone Charge your Cell Phones by wearing these special shoes, developed by Tom Krupenkin and J. Ashley Taylor at the University of Wisconsin Madison. The mechanical energy is converted to electrical energy by using a micro-fluid based device, consisting of thousands of liquid micro-droplets interacting with a nano-structured substrate. Placed in a shoe, the device captures the energy of moving micro droplets and converts it into electrical current. There is enough power, according to the researchers, to charge a standard mobile phone or laptop. Getting the energy from the device to the handset presents another challenge. One way is to plug a USB cable into the shoe – probably not the most practical option. There are a lot of places where this kind of power would be useful. The military could put it in boots and cut way back on the number of batteries a typical soldier has to carry. Right now they have to walk around with up to 20 pounds worth to power various electronic devices such as night vision goggles, laptops and GPS units. If nothing else, this method of powering phones might end up encouraging more people to exercise. And think of the possibilities if you run marathons. Another solution would be to use the power-excavating shoe as an intermediary between cell phone towers and your phone, like a long-distance radio. As searching for a signal is a huge drain on a phone’s power, Krupenkin said this method is a huge energy saver and could make your phone’s battery last as much as 10 times longer. Source: technodiscoveries.com

Walk to Charge your Cell Phone Charge your Cell Phones by wearing these special shoes, developed by Tom Krupenkin and J. Ashley Taylor at the University of Wisconsin Madison. The mechanical energy is converted to electrical energy by using a micro-fluid based device, consisting of thousands of liquid micro-droplets interacting with a nano-structured substrate. Placed in a shoe, the device captures the energy of moving micro droplets and converts it into electrical current. There is enough power, according to the researchers, to charge a standard mobile phone or laptop. Getting the energy from the device to the handset presents another challenge. One way is to plug a USB cable into the shoe – probably not the most practical option. There are a lot of places where this kind of power would be useful. The military could put it in boots and cut way back on the number of batteries a typical soldier has to carry. Right now they have to walk around with up to 20 pounds worth to power various electronic devices such as night vision goggles, laptops and GPS units. If nothing else, this method of powering phones might end up encouraging more people to exercise. And think of the possibilities if you run marathons. Another solution would be to use the power-excavating shoe as an intermediary between cell phone towers and your phone, like a long-distance radio. As searching for a signal is a huge drain on a phone’s power, Krupenkin said this method is a huge energy saver and could make your phone’s battery last as much as 10 times longer. Source: technodiscoveries.com

Walk to Charge your Cell Phone Charge your Cell Phones by wearing these special shoes, developed by Tom Krupenkin and J. Ashley Taylor at the University of Wisconsin Madison. The mechanical energy is converted to electrical energy by using a micro-fluid based device, consisting of thousands of liquid micro-droplets interacting with a nano-structured substrate. Placed in a shoe, the device captures the energy of moving micro droplets and converts it into electrical current. There is enough power, according to the researchers, to charge a standard mobile phone or laptop. Getting the energy from the device to the handset presents another challenge. One way is to plug a USB cable into the shoe – probably not the most practical option. There are a lot of places where this kind of power would be useful. The military could put it in boots and cut way back on the number of batteries a typical soldier has to carry. Right now they have to walk around with up to 20 pounds worth to power various electronic devices such as night vision goggles, laptops and GPS units. If nothing else, this method of powering phones might end up encouraging more people to exercise. And think of the possibilities if you run marathons. Another solution would be to use the power-excavating shoe as an intermediary between cell phone towers and your phone, like a long-distance radio. As searching for a signal is a huge drain on a phone’s power, Krupenkin said this method is a huge energy saver and could make your phone’s battery last as much as 10 times longer. Source: technodiscoveries.com

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