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... HEARTBLEED BUG AFFECTS ‘ALMOST EVERYONE,’ EXPERT WARNS ... Experts say the Heartbleed OpenSSL bug – a flaw in the network software meant to protect your data — may have actually allowed hackers to steal the very data it’s meant to guard. Think you’re safe from this obscure bug in OpenSSL, whatever that is? Think again. One expert noted that “almost everyone” uses it. “Given that over half of the world’s webservers use Apache, and Apache uses OpenSSL, the majority of people are using applications built on top of OpenSSL on a regular basis,” explained Steve Pate, the Chief Architect at cloud services company HyTrust.

... HEARTBLEED BUG AFFECTS ‘ALMOST EVERYONE,’ EXPERT WARNS ... Experts say the Heartbleed OpenSSL bug – a flaw in the network software meant to protect your data — may have actually allowed hackers to steal the very data it’s meant to guard. Think you’re safe from this obscure bug in OpenSSL, whatever that is? Think again. One expert noted that “almost everyone” uses it. “Given that over half of the world’s webservers use Apache, and Apache uses OpenSSL, the majority of people are using applications built on top of OpenSSL on a regular basis,” explained Steve Pate, the Chief Architect at cloud services company HyTrust.

... HEARTBLEED BUG AFFECTS ‘ALMOST EVERYONE,’ EXPERT WARNS ... Experts say the Heartbleed OpenSSL bug – a flaw in the network software meant to protect your data — may have actually allowed hackers to steal the very data it’s meant to guard. Think you’re safe from this obscure bug in OpenSSL, whatever that is? Think again. One expert noted that “almost everyone” uses it. “Given that over half of the world’s webservers use Apache, and Apache uses OpenSSL, the majority of people are using applications built on top of OpenSSL on a regular basis,” explained Steve Pate, the Chief Architect at cloud services company HyTrust.

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:: The second that almost brought down the Internet :: The weekend was pretty disastrous for websites around the Internet. First, storms in United States knocked out power in Amazon's data centres, and with it, around 1% of American websites. This included popular websites like Foursquare, Instagram, Pinterest and Netflix. (See: Instagram, Pinterest suffer extended outages after US storms) Then, just as websites were hobbling back to life, the "leap second" bug struck. Timekeepers had announced plans to add an extra second to June 30, to compensate for Earth's movement around the Sun. This "leap second" is added to the International Atomic Time (TAI) to ensure that Earth's clocks stay in-sync with "solar-time". Many computers use Network Time Protocol (NTP) to keep their clocks synchronised with the International Atomic Time. When the atomic time keepers added a second at 23:59:59 on Saturday, just like they said they would, all hell broke lose. Servers, especially those running on some versions of Java and Linux, choked on the "leap second", bringing down with them some of the most popular websites in the world.

:: The second that almost brought down the Internet :: The weekend was pretty disastrous for websites around the Internet. First, storms in United States knocked out power in Amazon's data centres, and with it, around 1% of American websites. This included popular websites like Foursquare, Instagram, Pinterest and Netflix. (See: Instagram, Pinterest suffer extended outages after US storms) Then, just as websites were hobbling back to life, the "leap second" bug struck. Timekeepers had announced plans to add an extra second to June 30, to compensate for Earth's movement around the Sun. This "leap second" is added to the International Atomic Time (TAI) to ensure that Earth's clocks stay in-sync with "solar-time". Many computers use Network Time Protocol (NTP) to keep their clocks synchronised with the International Atomic Time. When the atomic time keepers added a second at 23:59:59 on Saturday, just like they said they would, all hell broke lose. Servers, especially those running on some versions of Java and Linux, choked on the "leap second", bringing down with them some of the most popular websites in the world.

:: The second that almost brought down the Internet :: The weekend was pretty disastrous for websites around the Internet. First, storms in United States knocked out power in Amazon's data centres, and with it, around 1% of American websites. This included popular websites like Foursquare, Instagram, Pinterest and Netflix. (See: Instagram, Pinterest suffer extended outages after US storms) Then, just as websites were hobbling back to life, the "leap second" bug struck. Timekeepers had announced plans to add an extra second to June 30, to compensate for Earth's movement around the Sun. This "leap second" is added to the International Atomic Time (TAI) to ensure that Earth's clocks stay in-sync with "solar-time". Many computers use Network Time Protocol (NTP) to keep their clocks synchronised with the International Atomic Time. When the atomic time keepers added a second at 23:59:59 on Saturday, just like they said they would, all hell broke lose. Servers, especially those running on some versions of Java and Linux, choked on the "leap second", bringing down with them some of the most popular websites in the world.

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:: Mac OS X Update 10.7.3 App Issue Fix Rolled Out By Apple :: If you are one of the users who has been experiencing problems, since upgrading and installing the new Mac OS X 10.7.3 update that rolled out yesterday. You will be pleased to learn that a new patch has been rolled out by Apple, which now hopes to solve the problems. Shortly after the 10.7.3 update was rolled out yesterday mac users started posting on the Apple forums problems they were experiencing. However the fix does not come directly in response to the bug, but is an official Apple-made software download. The problem is, the bug itself is one that closes all applications as you open them. This error is also being called the CUI CUI CUI error because of the letters that pop up on your display when an application is opened. A fix has been found in an Apple forums discussion thread by a fellow by the name of nmphotog who notes that he or she has been able to download a COMBO update. Source :- geekygadgets.com

::iOS 5.1 Beta 2 Released, Users Can Now Delete Photos from Photo Stream :: When Apple introduced iOS 5 back in October, one of the biggest features added to the company’s repertoire was its new iCloud service. In Apple’s words, iCloud gives users the ability to access their content on all their different iDevices, automatically and effortlessly. But a huge gripe began to emerge regarding photo stream once the service became public: the inability to delete photos. It seems the head honchos at Apple have been listening to our cries as Beta 2 of iOS 5.1, which was just released, allows users to do just that. Among the obligatory bug fixes and performance upgrades, Apple’s latest beta will allow users to delete photos from their photo stream. All those incriminating photos will no longer be consumed by the cloud. Another fix that is hopefully addressed is the dreadful battery issue plaguing some iPhone 4S users. We’ll find out in due time, of course, and probably see iOS 5.1 released soon. Source :- technobuffalo.com