Facebook announced in November that its users would be able to share status updates up to 63 206 characters long That s a little harder to visualize than Twitter s 140 character limit If you re curious how Facebook arrived at this seemingly random number Facebook engineer Bob Baldwin explained to ZDnet I set the exact limit to something nerdy Facebook Face Boo K hex FACE K 64206 1000 63206 In other words Baldwin calculated the number using the hexadecimal numeral system The hexadecimal value of FACE is 64 206 Then Baldwin subtracted K or kilo the prefix for 1 000 to arrive at 63 206

 Facebook announced in November that its users would be able to share status updates up to 63,206 characters long. That’s a little harder to visualize than Twitter’s 140-character limit.If you’re curious how Facebook arrived at this seemingly random number, Facebook engineer Bob Baldwin explained to ZDnet, “I set the exact limit to something nerdy. Facebook … Face Boo K … hex(FACE) – K … 64206 – 1000 = 63206.” In other words, Baldwin calculated the number using the hexadecimal numeral system: The hexadecimal value of “FACE” is 64,206. Then, Baldwin subtracted “K,” or “kilo-” (the prefix for 1,000), to arrive at 63,206

Facebook announced in November that its users would be able to share status updates up to 63,206 characters long. That’s a little harder to visualize than Twitter’s 140-character limit.If you’re curious how Facebook arrived at this seemingly random number, Facebook engineer Bob Baldwin explained to ZDnet, “I set the exact limit to something nerdy. Facebook … Face Boo K … hex(FACE) – K … 64206 – 1000 = 63206.” In other words, Baldwin calculated the number using the hexadecimal numeral system: The hexadecimal value of “FACE” is 64,206. Then, Baldwin subtracted “K,” or “kilo-” (the prefix for 1,000), to arrive at 63,206

Facebook announced in November that its users would be able to share status updates up to 63,206 characters long. That’s a little harder to visualize than Twitter’s 140-character limit.If you’re curious how Facebook arrived at this seemingly random number, Facebook engineer Bob Baldwin explained to ZDnet, “I set the exact limit to something nerdy. Facebook … Face Boo K … hex(FACE) – K … 64206 – 1000 = 63206.” In other words, Baldwin calculated the number using the hexadecimal numeral system: The hexadecimal value of “FACE” is 64,206. Then, Baldwin subtracted “K,” or “kilo-” (the prefix for 1,000), to arrive at 63,206

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