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Apple Unveils iOS 7, 'Biggest Change Since the Original iPhone': "Control Center" New in iOS 7 is a Control Center. It's an area that can be activated from within any app that brings control to Wi-Fi, brightness and other frequently accessed settings. "Multitasking" iOS 7 will bring better multitasking and background processing to all apps. It will monitor which apps you use frequently to help determine which ones need more full-functioning multitasking. "AirDrop" Apple is bringing OS X's AirDrop to iOS. AirDrop will let users share photos or files peer-to-peer with other iOS users who are nearby. "No bumping required." "Photos and Camera" - Siri - iOS in the Car - New App Store - Music and iTunes Radio - More Notification Sync Audio-only Facetime Weibo Integration in China Per-app VPN for Enterprise Plus more than 1500 APIs, support for third-party game controllers, new multitasking APIs.

Apple Unveils iOS 7, 'Biggest Change Since the Original iPhone': "Control Center" New in iOS 7 is a Control Center. It's an area that can be activated from within any app that brings control to Wi-Fi, brightness and other frequently accessed settings. "Multitasking" iOS 7 will bring better multitasking and background processing to all apps. It will monitor which apps you use frequently to help determine which ones need more full-functioning multitasking. "AirDrop" Apple is bringing OS X's AirDrop to iOS. AirDrop will let users share photos or files peer-to-peer with other iOS users who are nearby. "No bumping required." "Photos and Camera" - Siri - iOS in the Car - New App Store - Music and iTunes Radio - More Notification Sync Audio-only Facetime Weibo Integration in China Per-app VPN for Enterprise Plus more than 1500 APIs, support for third-party game controllers, new multitasking APIs.

Apple Unveils iOS 7, 'Biggest Change Since the Original iPhone': "Control Center" New in iOS 7 is a Control Center. It's an area that can be activated from within any app that brings control to Wi-Fi, brightness and other frequently accessed settings. "Multitasking" iOS 7 will bring better multitasking and background processing to all apps. It will monitor which apps you use frequently to help determine which ones need more full-functioning multitasking. "AirDrop" Apple is bringing OS X's AirDrop to iOS. AirDrop will let users share photos or files peer-to-peer with other iOS users who are nearby. "No bumping required." "Photos and Camera" - Siri - iOS in the Car - New App Store - Music and iTunes Radio - More Notification Sync Audio-only Facetime Weibo Integration in China Per-app VPN for Enterprise Plus more than 1500 APIs, support for third-party game controllers, new multitasking APIs.

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Huge Rock Crashes Into Moon, Sparks Giant Explosion NASA astronomers have been monitoring the moon for lunar meteor impacts for the past eight years, and haven't seen anything this powerful before. The moon has a new hole on its surface thanks to a boulder that slammed into it in March, creating the biggest explosion scientists have seen on the moon since they started monitoring it. The meteorite crashed on March 17, slamming into the lunar surface at a mind-boggling 56,000 mph (90,000 kph) and creating a new crater 65 feet wide (20 meters). The crash sparked a bright flash of light that would have been visible to anyone looking at the moon at the time with the naked eye, NASA scientists say. "On March 17, 2013, an object about the size of a small boulder hit the lunar surface in Mare Imbrium," Bill Cooke of NASA's Meteoroid Environment Office said in a statement. "It exploded in a flash nearly 10 times as bright as anything we've ever seen before."

Huge Rock Crashes Into Moon, Sparks Giant Explosion NASA astronomers have been monitoring the moon for lunar meteor impacts for the past eight years, and haven't seen anything this powerful before. The moon has a new hole on its surface thanks to a boulder that slammed into it in March, creating the biggest explosion scientists have seen on the moon since they started monitoring it. The meteorite crashed on March 17, slamming into the lunar surface at a mind-boggling 56,000 mph (90,000 kph) and creating a new crater 65 feet wide (20 meters). The crash sparked a bright flash of light that would have been visible to anyone looking at the moon at the time with the naked eye, NASA scientists say. "On March 17, 2013, an object about the size of a small boulder hit the lunar surface in Mare Imbrium," Bill Cooke of NASA's Meteoroid Environment Office said in a statement. "It exploded in a flash nearly 10 times as bright as anything we've ever seen before."

Huge Rock Crashes Into Moon, Sparks Giant Explosion NASA astronomers have been monitoring the moon for lunar meteor impacts for the past eight years, and haven't seen anything this powerful before. The moon has a new hole on its surface thanks to a boulder that slammed into it in March, creating the biggest explosion scientists have seen on the moon since they started monitoring it. The meteorite crashed on March 17, slamming into the lunar surface at a mind-boggling 56,000 mph (90,000 kph) and creating a new crater 65 feet wide (20 meters). The crash sparked a bright flash of light that would have been visible to anyone looking at the moon at the time with the naked eye, NASA scientists say. "On March 17, 2013, an object about the size of a small boulder hit the lunar surface in Mare Imbrium," Bill Cooke of NASA's Meteoroid Environment Office said in a statement. "It exploded in a flash nearly 10 times as bright as anything we've ever seen before."

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2013 Invention Awards: Ballast Bulb A household lamp powered by a bag of rocks. More than 780 million people rely on kerosene to light their homes. But the fuel is pricey and is toxic when burned—not to mention a fire hazard. In 2008, London-based product designer Martin Riddiford and his colleague Jim Reeves decided to create a cheap, safe alternative. Riddiford knew a falling weight could produce enough energy to run a grandfather clock, so why not a light? To find out, he attached the crank of a wind-up flashlight to a bicycle wheel. He hung a weight from the wheel to cause it to spin; the wheel cranked the flashlight, and the device lit up. Over the next four years, Riddiford, Reeves, and a small team spent their downtime between projects in a basement, refining the GravityLight. To use it, a person hangs the device and fills an attached fabric bag with up to 28 pounds of rocks, dirt, or other material. Lifting and releasing the bag steadily pulls a notched belt through GravityLight’s plastic hub; the belt spins a series of gears to drive a small motor, which continuously powers an LED for about 30 minutes. The team used crowdfunding to manufacture 1,000 GravityLights, which it plans to send to developing countries for field testing—plus 6,000 more for backers. “It’s exciting to witness so much positive reaction to what we’re doing,” Riddiford says. Besides remote villages, the lamp could prove handy in campsites, closets, and any dark nook far from a socket, so Riddiford also hopes to license a retail version for less than $10. GravityLight: Graham Murdoch HOW IT WORKS 1) As a weighted bag descends, it tugs a belt to turn a series of plastic gears. 2) The gears work in unison to spin an electric motor. 3) The motor powers a small yet bright LED, providing continuous illumination for about 30 minutes—the maximum amount of time that the bag can take to descend. 4) External connectors can power low-voltage devices, and the entire system is designed to work for thousands of lift-and-drop cycles. INVENTORS : Jim Reeves, Martin Riddiford COMPANY : Therefore INVENTION : GravityLight

2013 Invention Awards: Ballast Bulb A household lamp powered by a bag of rocks. More than 780 million people rely on kerosene to light their homes. But the fuel is pricey and is toxic when burned—not to mention a fire hazard. In 2008, London-based product designer Martin Riddiford and his colleague Jim Reeves decided to create a cheap, safe alternative. Riddiford knew a falling weight could produce enough energy to run a grandfather clock, so why not a light? To find out, he attached the crank of a wind-up flashlight to a bicycle wheel. He hung a weight from the wheel to cause it to spin; the wheel cranked the flashlight, and the device lit up. Over the next four years, Riddiford, Reeves, and a small team spent their downtime between projects in a basement, refining the GravityLight. To use it, a person hangs the device and fills an attached fabric bag with up to 28 pounds of rocks, dirt, or other material. Lifting and releasing the bag steadily pulls a notched belt through GravityLight’s plastic hub; the belt spins a series of gears to drive a small motor, which continuously powers an LED for about 30 minutes. The team used crowdfunding to manufacture 1,000 GravityLights, which it plans to send to developing countries for field testing—plus 6,000 more for backers. “It’s exciting to witness so much positive reaction to what we’re doing,” Riddiford says. Besides remote villages, the lamp could prove handy in campsites, closets, and any dark nook far from a socket, so Riddiford also hopes to license a retail version for less than $10. GravityLight: Graham Murdoch HOW IT WORKS 1) As a weighted bag descends, it tugs a belt to turn a series of plastic gears. 2) The gears work in unison to spin an electric motor. 3) The motor powers a small yet bright LED, providing continuous illumination for about 30 minutes—the maximum amount of time that the bag can take to descend. 4) External connectors can power low-voltage devices, and the entire system is designed to work for thousands of lift-and-drop cycles. INVENTORS : Jim Reeves, Martin Riddiford COMPANY : Therefore INVENTION : GravityLight

2013 Invention Awards: Ballast Bulb A household lamp powered by a bag of rocks. More than 780 million people rely on kerosene to light their homes. But the fuel is pricey and is toxic when burned—not to mention a fire hazard. In 2008, London-based product designer Martin Riddiford and his colleague Jim Reeves decided to create a cheap, safe alternative. Riddiford knew a falling weight could produce enough energy to run a grandfather clock, so why not a light? To find out, he attached the crank of a wind-up flashlight to a bicycle wheel. He hung a weight from the wheel to cause it to spin; the wheel cranked the flashlight, and the device lit up. Over the next four years, Riddiford, Reeves, and a small team spent their downtime between projects in a basement, refining the GravityLight. To use it, a person hangs the device and fills an attached fabric bag with up to 28 pounds of rocks, dirt, or other material. Lifting and releasing the bag steadily pulls a notched belt through GravityLight’s plastic hub; the belt spins a series of gears to drive a small motor, which continuously powers an LED for about 30 minutes. The team used crowdfunding to manufacture 1,000 GravityLights, which it plans to send to developing countries for field testing—plus 6,000 more for backers. “It’s exciting to witness so much positive reaction to what we’re doing,” Riddiford says. Besides remote villages, the lamp could prove handy in campsites, closets, and any dark nook far from a socket, so Riddiford also hopes to license a retail version for less than $10. GravityLight: Graham Murdoch HOW IT WORKS 1) As a weighted bag descends, it tugs a belt to turn a series of plastic gears. 2) The gears work in unison to spin an electric motor. 3) The motor powers a small yet bright LED, providing continuous illumination for about 30 minutes—the maximum amount of time that the bag can take to descend. 4) External connectors can power low-voltage devices, and the entire system is designed to work for thousands of lift-and-drop cycles. INVENTORS : Jim Reeves, Martin Riddiford COMPANY : Therefore INVENTION : GravityLight

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The 3D Printer has a Bright Future Making Unique Chocolates Chocolate lovers around the world may be able to make or request their own unique 3D chocolate creations. At the University of Exeter in the UK a 3D printer has been modified to squirt chocolate instead of instead of ink or plastic, allowing personalised 3D designs to be made to order. Chocolate is good for you and healthy. Read More -- http://janderson99.hubpages.com/hub/The-3D-Printer-has-a-Bright-Future-Making-Unique-Chocolates

The 3D Printer has a Bright Future Making Unique Chocolates Chocolate lovers around the world may be able to make or request their own unique 3D chocolate creations. At the University of Exeter in the UK a 3D printer has been modified to squirt chocolate instead of instead of ink or plastic, allowing personalised 3D designs to be made to order. Chocolate is good for you and healthy. Read More -- http://janderson99.hubpages.com/hub/The-3D-Printer-has-a-Bright-Future-Making-Unique-Chocolates

The 3D Printer has a Bright Future Making Unique Chocolates Chocolate lovers around the world may be able to make or request their own unique 3D chocolate creations. At the University of Exeter in the UK a 3D printer has been modified to squirt chocolate instead of instead of ink or plastic, allowing personalised 3D designs to be made to order. Chocolate is good for you and healthy. Read More -- http://janderson99.hubpages.com/hub/The-3D-Printer-has-a-Bright-Future-Making-Unique-Chocolates

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Samsung Galaxy Note II: Bigger, better, smarter Note II is a powerful and multi-functional device. It is not a smartphone because it is too big. And it is not a tablet because it is too small. But it can function like both and given its powerful hardware and some smart software can do justice to its all-in-one credentials. It is fast and there is no hint of lag, irrespective of the number of apps running in the background or the work you are doing. Screen is bright, has fantastic touch response and shows vivid colours. Pictures taken with the primary camera are sharp and detailed in daylight, though in low light some grain creeps in. The 1080 videos, though not as good as the still pictures, are bright and have everything in focus!

Samsung Galaxy Note II: Bigger, better, smarter Note II is a powerful and multi-functional device. It is not a smartphone because it is too big. And it is not a tablet because it is too small. But it can function like both and given its powerful hardware and some smart software can do justice to its all-in-one credentials. It is fast and there is no hint of lag, irrespective of the number of apps running in the background or the work you are doing. Screen is bright, has fantastic touch response and shows vivid colours. Pictures taken with the primary camera are sharp and detailed in daylight, though in low light some grain creeps in. The 1080 videos, though not as good as the still pictures, are bright and have everything in focus!

Samsung Galaxy Note II: Bigger, better, smarter Note II is a powerful and multi-functional device. It is not a smartphone because it is too big. And it is not a tablet because it is too small. But it can function like both and given its powerful hardware and some smart software can do justice to its all-in-one credentials. It is fast and there is no hint of lag, irrespective of the number of apps running in the background or the work you are doing. Screen is bright, has fantastic touch response and shows vivid colours. Pictures taken with the primary camera are sharp and detailed in daylight, though in low light some grain creeps in. The 1080 videos, though not as good as the still pictures, are bright and have everything in focus!

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:: Sony Unveils 4K Home Cinema Projector :: Sony has this week taken the wraps off its projector creation in the form of the Sony VPL-VW1000ES projector. Which is capable of projecting images at a fantastic 4096 x 2160 resolution. The Sony VPL-VW1000ES supports 3D content and requires active-shutter 3D glasses. It’s equipped with 1,000,000:1 dynamic contrast ratio and produces a 2,000 ANSI-lumens of brightness, and the 330W bulb provides 2,000 to 2,500 hours of use.

:: Sony Unveils 4K Home Cinema Projector :: Sony has this week taken the wraps off its projector creation in the form of the Sony VPL-VW1000ES projector. Which is capable of projecting images at a fantastic 4096 x 2160 resolution. The Sony VPL-VW1000ES supports 3D content and requires active-shutter 3D glasses. It’s equipped with 1,000,000:1 dynamic contrast ratio and produces a 2,000 ANSI-lumens of brightness, and the 330W bulb provides 2,000 to 2,500 hours of use.

:: Sony Unveils 4K Home Cinema Projector :: Sony has this week taken the wraps off its projector creation in the form of the Sony VPL-VW1000ES projector. Which is capable of projecting images at a fantastic 4096 x 2160 resolution. The Sony VPL-VW1000ES supports 3D content and requires active-shutter 3D glasses. It’s equipped with 1,000,000:1 dynamic contrast ratio and produces a 2,000 ANSI-lumens of brightness, and the 330W bulb provides 2,000 to 2,500 hours of use.

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We’ve been hearing the rumors for months, and now Samsung has gotten official with the newest member of its Galaxy line of smartphones, the Galaxy S III. Samsung announced the most anticipated Android handset of the year Thursday at an event in London. The phone is the third-generation in a line of popular smartphones created by Samsung. The phone has a 4.8-inch touchscreen, 8-megapixel rear-facing and 1.9-megapixel forward-facing camera, and comes running the latest version of Android — Ice Cream Sandwich. Much like the HTC One X, the camera has zero shutter lag so you can capture photos instantly. The camera is also capable of taking 20 photos at once in burst mode, and a feature called “Best Photo” will pick the best shot out of a group of eight. The NFC-capable Galaxy S III has a Super AMOLED HD (1280×720) screen, offering more subpixels than other screens, resulting in improved colors as well as better visibility in bright situations. “With the GALAXY S III, Samsung has maximized the consumer benefits by integrating superior hardware with enhanced smartphone usability,” said JK Shin, President and Head of IT & Mobile Communications Division at Samsung. “Designed to be both effortlessly smart and intuitively simple, the GALAXY S III has been created with our human needs and capabilities in mind. What makes me most proud is that it enables one of the most seamless, natural and human-centric mobile experiences, opening up a new horizon that allows you to live a life extraordinary.” The phone is powered by a 1.4GHz Samsung Exynos 4 Quad processor (see video below). The Exynos 4 has twice the processing capability of the older Exynos 4 Dual used in previous Galaxy phones, and it consumes 20% less power. To achieve this level of efficiency, Samsung has implemented on-off switching as well as dynamic voltage and frequency scaling for each core. All that means the processor will consume exactly the amount of power it needs under any given workload. -Source Mashable

We’ve been hearing the rumors for months, and now Samsung has gotten official with the newest member of its Galaxy line of smartphones, the Galaxy S III. Samsung announced the most anticipated Android handset of the year Thursday at an event in London. The phone is the third-generation in a line of popular smartphones created by Samsung. The phone has a 4.8-inch touchscreen, 8-megapixel rear-facing and 1.9-megapixel forward-facing camera, and comes running the latest version of Android — Ice Cream Sandwich. Much like the HTC One X, the camera has zero shutter lag so you can capture photos instantly. The camera is also capable of taking 20 photos at once in burst mode, and a feature called “Best Photo” will pick the best shot out of a group of eight. The NFC-capable Galaxy S III has a Super AMOLED HD (1280×720) screen, offering more subpixels than other screens, resulting in improved colors as well as better visibility in bright situations. “With the GALAXY S III, Samsung has maximized the consumer benefits by integrating superior hardware with enhanced smartphone usability,” said JK Shin, President and Head of IT & Mobile Communications Division at Samsung. “Designed to be both effortlessly smart and intuitively simple, the GALAXY S III has been created with our human needs and capabilities in mind. What makes me most proud is that it enables one of the most seamless, natural and human-centric mobile experiences, opening up a new horizon that allows you to live a life extraordinary.” The phone is powered by a 1.4GHz Samsung Exynos 4 Quad processor (see video below). The Exynos 4 has twice the processing capability of the older Exynos 4 Dual used in previous Galaxy phones, and it consumes 20% less power. To achieve this level of efficiency, Samsung has implemented on-off switching as well as dynamic voltage and frequency scaling for each core. All that means the processor will consume exactly the amount of power it needs under any given workload. -Source Mashable

We’ve been hearing the rumors for months, and now Samsung has gotten official with the newest member of its Galaxy line of smartphones, the Galaxy S III. Samsung announced the most anticipated Android handset of the year Thursday at an event in London. The phone is the third-generation in a line of popular smartphones created by Samsung. The phone has a 4.8-inch touchscreen, 8-megapixel rear-facing and 1.9-megapixel forward-facing camera, and comes running the latest version of Android — Ice Cream Sandwich. Much like the HTC One X, the camera has zero shutter lag so you can capture photos instantly. The camera is also capable of taking 20 photos at once in burst mode, and a feature called “Best Photo” will pick the best shot out of a group of eight. The NFC-capable Galaxy S III has a Super AMOLED HD (1280×720) screen, offering more subpixels than other screens, resulting in improved colors as well as better visibility in bright situations. “With the GALAXY S III, Samsung has maximized the consumer benefits by integrating superior hardware with enhanced smartphone usability,” said JK Shin, President and Head of IT & Mobile Communications Division at Samsung. “Designed to be both effortlessly smart and intuitively simple, the GALAXY S III has been created with our human needs and capabilities in mind. What makes me most proud is that it enables one of the most seamless, natural and human-centric mobile experiences, opening up a new horizon that allows you to live a life extraordinary.” The phone is powered by a 1.4GHz Samsung Exynos 4 Quad processor (see video below). The Exynos 4 has twice the processing capability of the older Exynos 4 Dual used in previous Galaxy phones, and it consumes 20% less power. To achieve this level of efficiency, Samsung has implemented on-off switching as well as dynamic voltage and frequency scaling for each core. All that means the processor will consume exactly the amount of power it needs under any given workload. -Source Mashable

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:: India is second fastest growing market: Facebook :: Why is Facebook becoming more and more popular? Connectivity and accessibility are the biggest drawing cards, say users. Facebook also finds India equally indispensable. According to the Facebook data analyst, Inside Facebook Gold's 2011 data, India was the third biggest Facebook market after US and Indonesia, at 34.6 million users. And the growth rate of Indian users is at 162.4 percent, second only to that of Brazil. The statistics show that the social networks and Facebook in particular are only going to grow in times to come. Samir Parikh, chief psychiatrist at department of Mental Health and Behavioural Sciences, Max Healthcare, however, denied that this boom was a country specific phenomena limited to India. "The growth of Facebook has been universal across the globe. In India, the higher growth rates come from the much recent increase in accessibility of internet," Parikh said. "Social networking sprouts from the mankind's intrinsic need to stay and feel connected. Mankind is all about communication," he added. For Facebook loyalists, the two biggest draws are connectivity and easy accessibility. IT professional and long-time Facebook user Vinesh Nagpal says the social network lets him "stay in touch with my old college friends" On the other hand, Yogesh Kumar uses it for networking. "I use FB for networking, and yeah, it keeps me in touch with the friends too," said the Pune-based programmer. The chance to keep tabs on childhood friends is one of the biggest draws for Rituparna Borah who hails from Assam. "I use Facebook to connect with my friends with whom I am not in regular touch with. I also use it as a pastime," she said. The fact that Facebook is now multilingual and available in regional Indian languages like Punjabi or Bengali, combined with the rapid increase in the numbers of Mobile Internet Devices (MIDs) and smart phones in India can only mean a bright future for Facebook in the country. The main competition to Facebook's dominance over Indian social networks comes from Orkut and Google Plus. But many consider Orkut outdated, while Google's latest offering has yet to take off. "Orkut's interface started getting a bit too cluttered and a lot of spam in the network drove me away, although I used to be on Orkut for several years after launch of Facebook," said Raghav Tuli who accesses Facebook on his smart-phone more frequently than the computer. Source :- Gesia

:: India is second fastest growing market: Facebook :: Why is Facebook becoming more and more popular? Connectivity and accessibility are the biggest drawing cards, say users. Facebook also finds India equally indispensable. According to the Facebook data analyst, Inside Facebook Gold's 2011 data, India was the third biggest Facebook market after US and Indonesia, at 34.6 million users. And the growth rate of Indian users is at 162.4 percent, second only to that of Brazil. The statistics show that the social networks and Facebook in particular are only going to grow in times to come. Samir Parikh, chief psychiatrist at department of Mental Health and Behavioural Sciences, Max Healthcare, however, denied that this boom was a country specific phenomena limited to India. "The growth of Facebook has been universal across the globe. In India, the higher growth rates come from the much recent increase in accessibility of internet," Parikh said. "Social networking sprouts from the mankind's intrinsic need to stay and feel connected. Mankind is all about communication," he added. For Facebook loyalists, the two biggest draws are connectivity and easy accessibility. IT professional and long-time Facebook user Vinesh Nagpal says the social network lets him "stay in touch with my old college friends" On the other hand, Yogesh Kumar uses it for networking. "I use FB for networking, and yeah, it keeps me in touch with the friends too," said the Pune-based programmer. The chance to keep tabs on childhood friends is one of the biggest draws for Rituparna Borah who hails from Assam. "I use Facebook to connect with my friends with whom I am not in regular touch with. I also use it as a pastime," she said. The fact that Facebook is now multilingual and available in regional Indian languages like Punjabi or Bengali, combined with the rapid increase in the numbers of Mobile Internet Devices (MIDs) and smart phones in India can only mean a bright future for Facebook in the country. The main competition to Facebook's dominance over Indian social networks comes from Orkut and Google Plus. But many consider Orkut outdated, while Google's latest offering has yet to take off. "Orkut's interface started getting a bit too cluttered and a lot of spam in the network drove me away, although I used to be on Orkut for several years after launch of Facebook," said Raghav Tuli who accesses Facebook on his smart-phone more frequently than the computer. Source :- Gesia

:: India is second fastest growing market: Facebook :: Why is Facebook becoming more and more popular? Connectivity and accessibility are the biggest drawing cards, say users. Facebook also finds India equally indispensable. According to the Facebook data analyst, Inside Facebook Gold's 2011 data, India was the third biggest Facebook market after US and Indonesia, at 34.6 million users. And the growth rate of Indian users is at 162.4 percent, second only to that of Brazil. The statistics show that the social networks and Facebook in particular are only going to grow in times to come. Samir Parikh, chief psychiatrist at department of Mental Health and Behavioural Sciences, Max Healthcare, however, denied that this boom was a country specific phenomena limited to India. "The growth of Facebook has been universal across the globe. In India, the higher growth rates come from the much recent increase in accessibility of internet," Parikh said. "Social networking sprouts from the mankind's intrinsic need to stay and feel connected. Mankind is all about communication," he added. For Facebook loyalists, the two biggest draws are connectivity and easy accessibility. IT professional and long-time Facebook user Vinesh Nagpal says the social network lets him "stay in touch with my old college friends" On the other hand, Yogesh Kumar uses it for networking. "I use FB for networking, and yeah, it keeps me in touch with the friends too," said the Pune-based programmer. The chance to keep tabs on childhood friends is one of the biggest draws for Rituparna Borah who hails from Assam. "I use Facebook to connect with my friends with whom I am not in regular touch with. I also use it as a pastime," she said. The fact that Facebook is now multilingual and available in regional Indian languages like Punjabi or Bengali, combined with the rapid increase in the numbers of Mobile Internet Devices (MIDs) and smart phones in India can only mean a bright future for Facebook in the country. The main competition to Facebook's dominance over Indian social networks comes from Orkut and Google Plus. But many consider Orkut outdated, while Google's latest offering has yet to take off. "Orkut's interface started getting a bit too cluttered and a lot of spam in the network drove me away, although I used to be on Orkut for several years after launch of Facebook," said Raghav Tuli who accesses Facebook on his smart-phone more frequently than the computer. Source :- Gesia

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:: Facebook challenge: Cashing in on mobile devices :: Lots of people love their cellphones. Facebook, so far, is not a big fan. Amid the jaw-dropping financial figures the company revealed last week when it filed for a public offering was an interesting admission. Although more than half of its 845 million members log into Facebook on a mobile device, the company has not yet found a way to make real money from that use. "We do not currently directly generate any meaningful revenue from the use of Facebook mobile products, and our ability to do so successfully is unproven," the company said in its review of the risks it faces. In a world that is rapidly moving toward an era of mobile computing, this is a troubling issue for Silicon Valley's brightest star - particularly since much of Facebook's growth right now is in countries like Chile, Turkey, Venezuela and Brazil, where people largely have access to the Internet using cellphones. Facebook is not the only company struggling to translate the success of its website to mobile devices, where screen space is at a premium and people have little patience for clutter or slow loading times. It is a problem that plagues companies as diverse as news publishers and the streaming radio service Pandora, and it is likely to loom larger. There were more global shipments of smartphones than of personal computers in 2011, according to a recent report from Canalys, a research firm. But the issue seems particularly urgent in the case of Facebook, which is wildly popular among its users and is seen as a company of the future, a hybrid of social hub and information conduit, platform and publisher. In other words, if Facebook cannot figure it out, who can? Facebook brings in most of its revenue by selling space on its website to advertisers who want to reach its users. Overall spending on mobile advertising in the United States is expected to reach $2.6 billion this year, up 80 percent from $1.45 billion in 2011, according to research by eMarketer. But that will still be just a sliver of what is likely to be a $39.5 billion online advertising market. Google, a Facebook competitor on the Web, was the biggest player in the mobile ad market last year with about $750 million in revenue, and Apple came in second with more than $90 million, eMarketer says. "It's still immature when compared to online, print and TV advertising," said Noah Elkin, an analyst with eMarketer. "But it's growing at a faster pace, even though its revenues are still dwarfed by the other formats." If Facebook were to bring Zynga's games to its iPhone and iPad apps, for example, it would have to share that revenue with Apple, which requires app makers to hand over 30 percent of their proceeds. Google puts no such restrictions on apps for devices running its Android software, but given the increasing rivalry between Facebook and Google in social networking, Facebook is not in full control of its destiny there either. Source - Gesia

:: Facebook challenge: Cashing in on mobile devices :: Lots of people love their cellphones. Facebook, so far, is not a big fan. Amid the jaw-dropping financial figures the company revealed last week when it filed for a public offering was an interesting admission. Although more than half of its 845 million members log into Facebook on a mobile device, the company has not yet found a way to make real money from that use. "We do not currently directly generate any meaningful revenue from the use of Facebook mobile products, and our ability to do so successfully is unproven," the company said in its review of the risks it faces. In a world that is rapidly moving toward an era of mobile computing, this is a troubling issue for Silicon Valley's brightest star - particularly since much of Facebook's growth right now is in countries like Chile, Turkey, Venezuela and Brazil, where people largely have access to the Internet using cellphones. Facebook is not the only company struggling to translate the success of its website to mobile devices, where screen space is at a premium and people have little patience for clutter or slow loading times. It is a problem that plagues companies as diverse as news publishers and the streaming radio service Pandora, and it is likely to loom larger. There were more global shipments of smartphones than of personal computers in 2011, according to a recent report from Canalys, a research firm. But the issue seems particularly urgent in the case of Facebook, which is wildly popular among its users and is seen as a company of the future, a hybrid of social hub and information conduit, platform and publisher. In other words, if Facebook cannot figure it out, who can? Facebook brings in most of its revenue by selling space on its website to advertisers who want to reach its users. Overall spending on mobile advertising in the United States is expected to reach $2.6 billion this year, up 80 percent from $1.45 billion in 2011, according to research by eMarketer. But that will still be just a sliver of what is likely to be a $39.5 billion online advertising market. Google, a Facebook competitor on the Web, was the biggest player in the mobile ad market last year with about $750 million in revenue, and Apple came in second with more than $90 million, eMarketer says. "It's still immature when compared to online, print and TV advertising," said Noah Elkin, an analyst with eMarketer. "But it's growing at a faster pace, even though its revenues are still dwarfed by the other formats." If Facebook were to bring Zynga's games to its iPhone and iPad apps, for example, it would have to share that revenue with Apple, which requires app makers to hand over 30 percent of their proceeds. Google puts no such restrictions on apps for devices running its Android software, but given the increasing rivalry between Facebook and Google in social networking, Facebook is not in full control of its destiny there either. Source - Gesia

:: Facebook challenge: Cashing in on mobile devices :: Lots of people love their cellphones. Facebook, so far, is not a big fan. Amid the jaw-dropping financial figures the company revealed last week when it filed for a public offering was an interesting admission. Although more than half of its 845 million members log into Facebook on a mobile device, the company has not yet found a way to make real money from that use. "We do not currently directly generate any meaningful revenue from the use of Facebook mobile products, and our ability to do so successfully is unproven," the company said in its review of the risks it faces. In a world that is rapidly moving toward an era of mobile computing, this is a troubling issue for Silicon Valley's brightest star - particularly since much of Facebook's growth right now is in countries like Chile, Turkey, Venezuela and Brazil, where people largely have access to the Internet using cellphones. Facebook is not the only company struggling to translate the success of its website to mobile devices, where screen space is at a premium and people have little patience for clutter or slow loading times. It is a problem that plagues companies as diverse as news publishers and the streaming radio service Pandora, and it is likely to loom larger. There were more global shipments of smartphones than of personal computers in 2011, according to a recent report from Canalys, a research firm. But the issue seems particularly urgent in the case of Facebook, which is wildly popular among its users and is seen as a company of the future, a hybrid of social hub and information conduit, platform and publisher. In other words, if Facebook cannot figure it out, who can? Facebook brings in most of its revenue by selling space on its website to advertisers who want to reach its users. Overall spending on mobile advertising in the United States is expected to reach $2.6 billion this year, up 80 percent from $1.45 billion in 2011, according to research by eMarketer. But that will still be just a sliver of what is likely to be a $39.5 billion online advertising market. Google, a Facebook competitor on the Web, was the biggest player in the mobile ad market last year with about $750 million in revenue, and Apple came in second with more than $90 million, eMarketer says. "It's still immature when compared to online, print and TV advertising," said Noah Elkin, an analyst with eMarketer. "But it's growing at a faster pace, even though its revenues are still dwarfed by the other formats." If Facebook were to bring Zynga's games to its iPhone and iPad apps, for example, it would have to share that revenue with Apple, which requires app makers to hand over 30 percent of their proceeds. Google puts no such restrictions on apps for devices running its Android software, but given the increasing rivalry between Facebook and Google in social networking, Facebook is not in full control of its destiny there either. Source - Gesia

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:: Battery Care :: Often we have a habit of charging our batteries (of mobile phones, laptops,etc. ) even when its hardly drained, unknowing of the fact that it's just harming our devices.However even full battery discharges (until laptop power shutdown, 0%) should be avoided, because this stresses the battery a lot and can even damage it. It's recommended to perform partial discharges to capacity levels of 20~30% and frequent charges, instead of performing a full discharging followed by a full charging.One must say again that the battery's worst enemy is the heat, so leaving the laptop in the car in a hot summer day is half way to kill the battery. There a simple ways which are helpful in preserving & extending the battery life of any electronic gadget. :: Extend Mobile Phone Battery Life :: ->Turn-off wireless connection like Wi-Fi if you are not using them. ->Vibrating alert is another big power hungry feature in the mobile phone. Using vibrating alert is good when you are in meetings or in a library, otherwise you can turn off vibrating alert. ->Your mobile phone display also uses lot of power to illuminate. Reduce screen brightness to the lowest level possible where you can see things on the screen clearly. ->Keep your phone screen as simple as possible, using screensavers and animated wallpapers may look pretty but you must remember that they use up the battery power to stay running. ->Terminate applications as soon as you finished working on them. Pressing end key does not terminate the application, they still remain running in the background using up the battery power. ->Games are other power hungry applications, they use lot of power and most of the games do not allow the screen to dim or turn off. Play games less to save more on the battery. ->Try using few email accounts and disable automatic update feature if you do not really need it. ->Turn off BlueTooth when you are not using it. ->Avoid over heating of the battery to prevent damage to the mobile phone and to the battery. Keep your phone away from the direct Sun heat and any other radiations. Source :- Inhouse IT manager + Web!!