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Your domain should shine bright like your business. #domains #domainnames #domainsforsale #branding #website #godaddy #domainnameforsale #premiumdomains #bhfyp #CompuBrain

Your domain should shine bright like your business. #domains #domainnames #domainsforsale #branding #website #godaddy #domainnameforsale #premiumdomains #bhfyp #CompuBrain

Your domain should shine bright like your business. #domains #domainnames #domainsforsale #branding #website #godaddy #domainnameforsale #premiumdomains #bhfyp #CompuBrain

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Your domain should shine bright like your business. #domains #domainnames #domainsforsale #branding #website #godaddy #domainnameforsale #premiumdomains #bhfyp #CompuBrain https://t.co/eCF03KUKOk

Your domain should shine bright like your business. #domains #domainnames #domainsforsale #branding #website #godaddy #domainnameforsale #premiumdomains #bhfyp #CompuBrain https://t.co/eCF03KUKOk

Your domain should shine bright like your business. #domains #domainnames #domainsforsale #branding #website #godaddy #domainnameforsale #premiumdomains #bhfyp #CompuBrain https://t.co/eCF03KUKOk

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Your domain should shine bright like your business. #domains #domainnames #domainsforsale #branding #website #godaddy #domainnameforsale #premiumdomains #bhfyp #CompuBrain

Your domain should shine bright like your business. #domains #domainnames #domainsforsale #branding #website #godaddy #domainnameforsale #premiumdomains #bhfyp #CompuBrain

Your domain should shine bright like your business. #domains #domainnames #domainsforsale #branding #website #godaddy #domainnameforsale #premiumdomains #bhfyp #CompuBrain

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Apple Unveils iOS 7, 'Biggest Change Since the Original iPhone': "Control Center" New in iOS 7 is a Control Center. It's an area that can be activated from within any app that brings control to Wi-Fi, brightness and other frequently accessed settings. "Multitasking" iOS 7 will bring better multitasking and background processing to all apps. It will monitor which apps you use frequently to help determine which ones need more full-functioning multitasking. "AirDrop" Apple is bringing OS X's AirDrop to iOS. AirDrop will let users share photos or files peer-to-peer with other iOS users who are nearby. "No bumping required." "Photos and Camera" - Siri - iOS in the Car - New App Store - Music and iTunes Radio - More Notification Sync Audio-only Facetime Weibo Integration in China Per-app VPN for Enterprise Plus more than 1500 APIs, support for third-party game controllers, new multitasking APIs.

Apple Unveils iOS 7, 'Biggest Change Since the Original iPhone': "Control Center" New in iOS 7 is a Control Center. It's an area that can be activated from within any app that brings control to Wi-Fi, brightness and other frequently accessed settings. "Multitasking" iOS 7 will bring better multitasking and background processing to all apps. It will monitor which apps you use frequently to help determine which ones need more full-functioning multitasking. "AirDrop" Apple is bringing OS X's AirDrop to iOS. AirDrop will let users share photos or files peer-to-peer with other iOS users who are nearby. "No bumping required." "Photos and Camera" - Siri - iOS in the Car - New App Store - Music and iTunes Radio - More Notification Sync Audio-only Facetime Weibo Integration in China Per-app VPN for Enterprise Plus more than 1500 APIs, support for third-party game controllers, new multitasking APIs.

Apple Unveils iOS 7, 'Biggest Change Since the Original iPhone': "Control Center" New in iOS 7 is a Control Center. It's an area that can be activated from within any app that brings control to Wi-Fi, brightness and other frequently accessed settings. "Multitasking" iOS 7 will bring better multitasking and background processing to all apps. It will monitor which apps you use frequently to help determine which ones need more full-functioning multitasking. "AirDrop" Apple is bringing OS X's AirDrop to iOS. AirDrop will let users share photos or files peer-to-peer with other iOS users who are nearby. "No bumping required." "Photos and Camera" - Siri - iOS in the Car - New App Store - Music and iTunes Radio - More Notification Sync Audio-only Facetime Weibo Integration in China Per-app VPN for Enterprise Plus more than 1500 APIs, support for third-party game controllers, new multitasking APIs.

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Huge Rock Crashes Into Moon, Sparks Giant Explosion NASA astronomers have been monitoring the moon for lunar meteor impacts for the past eight years, and haven't seen anything this powerful before. The moon has a new hole on its surface thanks to a boulder that slammed into it in March, creating the biggest explosion scientists have seen on the moon since they started monitoring it. The meteorite crashed on March 17, slamming into the lunar surface at a mind-boggling 56,000 mph (90,000 kph) and creating a new crater 65 feet wide (20 meters). The crash sparked a bright flash of light that would have been visible to anyone looking at the moon at the time with the naked eye, NASA scientists say. "On March 17, 2013, an object about the size of a small boulder hit the lunar surface in Mare Imbrium," Bill Cooke of NASA's Meteoroid Environment Office said in a statement. "It exploded in a flash nearly 10 times as bright as anything we've ever seen before."

Huge Rock Crashes Into Moon, Sparks Giant Explosion NASA astronomers have been monitoring the moon for lunar meteor impacts for the past eight years, and haven't seen anything this powerful before. The moon has a new hole on its surface thanks to a boulder that slammed into it in March, creating the biggest explosion scientists have seen on the moon since they started monitoring it. The meteorite crashed on March 17, slamming into the lunar surface at a mind-boggling 56,000 mph (90,000 kph) and creating a new crater 65 feet wide (20 meters). The crash sparked a bright flash of light that would have been visible to anyone looking at the moon at the time with the naked eye, NASA scientists say. "On March 17, 2013, an object about the size of a small boulder hit the lunar surface in Mare Imbrium," Bill Cooke of NASA's Meteoroid Environment Office said in a statement. "It exploded in a flash nearly 10 times as bright as anything we've ever seen before."

Huge Rock Crashes Into Moon, Sparks Giant Explosion NASA astronomers have been monitoring the moon for lunar meteor impacts for the past eight years, and haven't seen anything this powerful before. The moon has a new hole on its surface thanks to a boulder that slammed into it in March, creating the biggest explosion scientists have seen on the moon since they started monitoring it. The meteorite crashed on March 17, slamming into the lunar surface at a mind-boggling 56,000 mph (90,000 kph) and creating a new crater 65 feet wide (20 meters). The crash sparked a bright flash of light that would have been visible to anyone looking at the moon at the time with the naked eye, NASA scientists say. "On March 17, 2013, an object about the size of a small boulder hit the lunar surface in Mare Imbrium," Bill Cooke of NASA's Meteoroid Environment Office said in a statement. "It exploded in a flash nearly 10 times as bright as anything we've ever seen before."

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2013 Invention Awards: Ballast Bulb A household lamp powered by a bag of rocks. More than 780 million people rely on kerosene to light their homes. But the fuel is pricey and is toxic when burned—not to mention a fire hazard. In 2008, London-based product designer Martin Riddiford and his colleague Jim Reeves decided to create a cheap, safe alternative. Riddiford knew a falling weight could produce enough energy to run a grandfather clock, so why not a light? To find out, he attached the crank of a wind-up flashlight to a bicycle wheel. He hung a weight from the wheel to cause it to spin; the wheel cranked the flashlight, and the device lit up. Over the next four years, Riddiford, Reeves, and a small team spent their downtime between projects in a basement, refining the GravityLight. To use it, a person hangs the device and fills an attached fabric bag with up to 28 pounds of rocks, dirt, or other material. Lifting and releasing the bag steadily pulls a notched belt through GravityLight’s plastic hub; the belt spins a series of gears to drive a small motor, which continuously powers an LED for about 30 minutes. The team used crowdfunding to manufacture 1,000 GravityLights, which it plans to send to developing countries for field testing—plus 6,000 more for backers. “It’s exciting to witness so much positive reaction to what we’re doing,” Riddiford says. Besides remote villages, the lamp could prove handy in campsites, closets, and any dark nook far from a socket, so Riddiford also hopes to license a retail version for less than $10. GravityLight: Graham Murdoch HOW IT WORKS 1) As a weighted bag descends, it tugs a belt to turn a series of plastic gears. 2) The gears work in unison to spin an electric motor. 3) The motor powers a small yet bright LED, providing continuous illumination for about 30 minutes—the maximum amount of time that the bag can take to descend. 4) External connectors can power low-voltage devices, and the entire system is designed to work for thousands of lift-and-drop cycles. INVENTORS : Jim Reeves, Martin Riddiford COMPANY : Therefore INVENTION : GravityLight

2013 Invention Awards: Ballast Bulb A household lamp powered by a bag of rocks. More than 780 million people rely on kerosene to light their homes. But the fuel is pricey and is toxic when burned—not to mention a fire hazard. In 2008, London-based product designer Martin Riddiford and his colleague Jim Reeves decided to create a cheap, safe alternative. Riddiford knew a falling weight could produce enough energy to run a grandfather clock, so why not a light? To find out, he attached the crank of a wind-up flashlight to a bicycle wheel. He hung a weight from the wheel to cause it to spin; the wheel cranked the flashlight, and the device lit up. Over the next four years, Riddiford, Reeves, and a small team spent their downtime between projects in a basement, refining the GravityLight. To use it, a person hangs the device and fills an attached fabric bag with up to 28 pounds of rocks, dirt, or other material. Lifting and releasing the bag steadily pulls a notched belt through GravityLight’s plastic hub; the belt spins a series of gears to drive a small motor, which continuously powers an LED for about 30 minutes. The team used crowdfunding to manufacture 1,000 GravityLights, which it plans to send to developing countries for field testing—plus 6,000 more for backers. “It’s exciting to witness so much positive reaction to what we’re doing,” Riddiford says. Besides remote villages, the lamp could prove handy in campsites, closets, and any dark nook far from a socket, so Riddiford also hopes to license a retail version for less than $10. GravityLight: Graham Murdoch HOW IT WORKS 1) As a weighted bag descends, it tugs a belt to turn a series of plastic gears. 2) The gears work in unison to spin an electric motor. 3) The motor powers a small yet bright LED, providing continuous illumination for about 30 minutes—the maximum amount of time that the bag can take to descend. 4) External connectors can power low-voltage devices, and the entire system is designed to work for thousands of lift-and-drop cycles. INVENTORS : Jim Reeves, Martin Riddiford COMPANY : Therefore INVENTION : GravityLight

2013 Invention Awards: Ballast Bulb A household lamp powered by a bag of rocks. More than 780 million people rely on kerosene to light their homes. But the fuel is pricey and is toxic when burned—not to mention a fire hazard. In 2008, London-based product designer Martin Riddiford and his colleague Jim Reeves decided to create a cheap, safe alternative. Riddiford knew a falling weight could produce enough energy to run a grandfather clock, so why not a light? To find out, he attached the crank of a wind-up flashlight to a bicycle wheel. He hung a weight from the wheel to cause it to spin; the wheel cranked the flashlight, and the device lit up. Over the next four years, Riddiford, Reeves, and a small team spent their downtime between projects in a basement, refining the GravityLight. To use it, a person hangs the device and fills an attached fabric bag with up to 28 pounds of rocks, dirt, or other material. Lifting and releasing the bag steadily pulls a notched belt through GravityLight’s plastic hub; the belt spins a series of gears to drive a small motor, which continuously powers an LED for about 30 minutes. The team used crowdfunding to manufacture 1,000 GravityLights, which it plans to send to developing countries for field testing—plus 6,000 more for backers. “It’s exciting to witness so much positive reaction to what we’re doing,” Riddiford says. Besides remote villages, the lamp could prove handy in campsites, closets, and any dark nook far from a socket, so Riddiford also hopes to license a retail version for less than $10. GravityLight: Graham Murdoch HOW IT WORKS 1) As a weighted bag descends, it tugs a belt to turn a series of plastic gears. 2) The gears work in unison to spin an electric motor. 3) The motor powers a small yet bright LED, providing continuous illumination for about 30 minutes—the maximum amount of time that the bag can take to descend. 4) External connectors can power low-voltage devices, and the entire system is designed to work for thousands of lift-and-drop cycles. INVENTORS : Jim Reeves, Martin Riddiford COMPANY : Therefore INVENTION : GravityLight

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The 3D Printer has a Bright Future Making Unique Chocolates Chocolate lovers around the world may be able to make or request their own unique 3D chocolate creations. At the University of Exeter in the UK a 3D printer has been modified to squirt chocolate instead of instead of ink or plastic, allowing personalised 3D designs to be made to order. Chocolate is good for you and healthy. Read More -- http://janderson99.hubpages.com/hub/The-3D-Printer-has-a-Bright-Future-Making-Unique-Chocolates

The 3D Printer has a Bright Future Making Unique Chocolates Chocolate lovers around the world may be able to make or request their own unique 3D chocolate creations. At the University of Exeter in the UK a 3D printer has been modified to squirt chocolate instead of instead of ink or plastic, allowing personalised 3D designs to be made to order. Chocolate is good for you and healthy. Read More -- http://janderson99.hubpages.com/hub/The-3D-Printer-has-a-Bright-Future-Making-Unique-Chocolates

The 3D Printer has a Bright Future Making Unique Chocolates Chocolate lovers around the world may be able to make or request their own unique 3D chocolate creations. At the University of Exeter in the UK a 3D printer has been modified to squirt chocolate instead of instead of ink or plastic, allowing personalised 3D designs to be made to order. Chocolate is good for you and healthy. Read More -- http://janderson99.hubpages.com/hub/The-3D-Printer-has-a-Bright-Future-Making-Unique-Chocolates

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Samsung Galaxy Note II: Bigger, better, smarter Note II is a powerful and multi-functional device. It is not a smartphone because it is too big. And it is not a tablet because it is too small. But it can function like both and given its powerful hardware and some smart software can do justice to its all-in-one credentials. It is fast and there is no hint of lag, irrespective of the number of apps running in the background or the work you are doing. Screen is bright, has fantastic touch response and shows vivid colours. Pictures taken with the primary camera are sharp and detailed in daylight, though in low light some grain creeps in. The 1080 videos, though not as good as the still pictures, are bright and have everything in focus!

Samsung Galaxy Note II: Bigger, better, smarter Note II is a powerful and multi-functional device. It is not a smartphone because it is too big. And it is not a tablet because it is too small. But it can function like both and given its powerful hardware and some smart software can do justice to its all-in-one credentials. It is fast and there is no hint of lag, irrespective of the number of apps running in the background or the work you are doing. Screen is bright, has fantastic touch response and shows vivid colours. Pictures taken with the primary camera are sharp and detailed in daylight, though in low light some grain creeps in. The 1080 videos, though not as good as the still pictures, are bright and have everything in focus!

Samsung Galaxy Note II: Bigger, better, smarter Note II is a powerful and multi-functional device. It is not a smartphone because it is too big. And it is not a tablet because it is too small. But it can function like both and given its powerful hardware and some smart software can do justice to its all-in-one credentials. It is fast and there is no hint of lag, irrespective of the number of apps running in the background or the work you are doing. Screen is bright, has fantastic touch response and shows vivid colours. Pictures taken with the primary camera are sharp and detailed in daylight, though in low light some grain creeps in. The 1080 videos, though not as good as the still pictures, are bright and have everything in focus!

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