CompuBrain Social Media 2.0 Best Social Media Agency Website Designing Company Ahmedabad Web Designing Agency Surat Search Engine Optimization Baroda Social Media Marketing Digital Media Agency Rajkot Technology Consultancy Mumbai Internet Reputation Management in Gujarat Hosting Services India

... The Top 5 Myths About PC Slowdown ... One of the most common and perplexing issues that confront PC users of all types is why their computers seem to slow down noticeably after only a few years of use. ---- ---- ---- ---- Myth #1: PCs slow down because their hardware components wear out. Fact: A computer’s hardware is built to last. It operates at exactly the same speed whether it’s brand new or many years old. ---- ---- ---- ---- Myth #2: The only way to speed up a slow unstable PC is to wipe the hard drive and re-install Windows. Fact: While performing a fresh install of the operating system is one way to get your PC to run faster, it is certainly not the only – nor even the most efficient or effective – way to do it. ---- ---- ---- ---- Myth #3: Windows 8 does not slow down like 7, Vista or XP. Fact: While Windows 8 has some really good improvements over previous versions of Windows, it slows down over time from normal use in almost exactly the same way as previous versions. ---- ---- ---- ---- Myth #4: New PCs run as fast as they ever will. Fact: A brand new PC’s speed can be improved by up to 25% by reconfiguring and optimizing system settings, removing unnecessary start-up items, and re-aligning program files dislodged by Windows updates and disk defragmenters. ---- ---- ---- ---- Myth #5: When a PC slows down, it’s almost always due to spyware. Fact: Modern spyware usually impacts a PC no differently than any other piece of software. ---- ---- ---- ---- Fact: A well-maintained PC will run at peak performance for years. Read with details : http://www.iolo.com/resources/articles/the-top-5-myths-about-pc-slowdown/

... The Top 5 Myths About PC Slowdown ... One of the most common and perplexing issues that confront PC users of all types is why their computers seem to slow down noticeably after only a few years of use. ---- ---- ---- ---- Myth #1: PCs slow down because their hardware components wear out. Fact: A computer’s hardware is built to last. It operates at exactly the same speed whether it’s brand new or many years old. ---- ---- ---- ---- Myth #2: The only way to speed up a slow unstable PC is to wipe the hard drive and re-install Windows. Fact: While performing a fresh install of the operating system is one way to get your PC to run faster, it is certainly not the only – nor even the most efficient or effective – way to do it. ---- ---- ---- ---- Myth #3: Windows 8 does not slow down like 7, Vista or XP. Fact: While Windows 8 has some really good improvements over previous versions of Windows, it slows down over time from normal use in almost exactly the same way as previous versions. ---- ---- ---- ---- Myth #4: New PCs run as fast as they ever will. Fact: A brand new PC’s speed can be improved by up to 25% by reconfiguring and optimizing system settings, removing unnecessary start-up items, and re-aligning program files dislodged by Windows updates and disk defragmenters. ---- ---- ---- ---- Myth #5: When a PC slows down, it’s almost always due to spyware. Fact: Modern spyware usually impacts a PC no differently than any other piece of software. ---- ---- ---- ---- Fact: A well-maintained PC will run at peak performance for years. Read with details : http://www.iolo.com/resources/articles/the-top-5-myths-about-pc-slowdown/

... The Top 5 Myths About PC Slowdown ... One of the most common and perplexing issues that confront PC users of all types is why their computers seem to slow down noticeably after only a few years of use. ---- ---- ---- ---- Myth #1: PCs slow down because their hardware components wear out. Fact: A computer’s hardware is built to last. It operates at exactly the same speed whether it’s brand new or many years old. ---- ---- ---- ---- Myth #2: The only way to speed up a slow unstable PC is to wipe the hard drive and re-install Windows. Fact: While performing a fresh install of the operating system is one way to get your PC to run faster, it is certainly not the only – nor even the most efficient or effective – way to do it. ---- ---- ---- ---- Myth #3: Windows 8 does not slow down like 7, Vista or XP. Fact: While Windows 8 has some really good improvements over previous versions of Windows, it slows down over time from normal use in almost exactly the same way as previous versions. ---- ---- ---- ---- Myth #4: New PCs run as fast as they ever will. Fact: A brand new PC’s speed can be improved by up to 25% by reconfiguring and optimizing system settings, removing unnecessary start-up items, and re-aligning program files dislodged by Windows updates and disk defragmenters. ---- ---- ---- ---- Myth #5: When a PC slows down, it’s almost always due to spyware. Fact: Modern spyware usually impacts a PC no differently than any other piece of software. ---- ---- ---- ---- Fact: A well-maintained PC will run at peak performance for years. Read with details : http://www.iolo.com/resources/articles/the-top-5-myths-about-pc-slowdown/

Read More

... Robots will be smarter than us all by 2029 ... By 2029, computers will be able to understand our language, learn from experience and outsmart even the most intelligent humans, according to Google’s director of engineering Ray Kurzweil. One of the world’s leading futurologists and artificial intelligence (AI) developers, 66-year-old Kurzweil has previous form in making accurate predictions about the way technology is heading.

... Robots will be smarter than us all by 2029 ... By 2029, computers will be able to understand our language, learn from experience and outsmart even the most intelligent humans, according to Google’s director of engineering Ray Kurzweil. One of the world’s leading futurologists and artificial intelligence (AI) developers, 66-year-old Kurzweil has previous form in making accurate predictions about the way technology is heading.

... Robots will be smarter than us all by 2029 ... By 2029, computers will be able to understand our language, learn from experience and outsmart even the most intelligent humans, according to Google’s director of engineering Ray Kurzweil. One of the world’s leading futurologists and artificial intelligence (AI) developers, 66-year-old Kurzweil has previous form in making accurate predictions about the way technology is heading.

Read More

Scientists build a transistor from DNA In a computer, a transistor acts like a tiny switch that can be turned on or off. Computer processors, or “chips,” use hundreds of millions — and often billions — of transistors to keep information flowing. They’re used for memory, too. For example, a photograph on a memory card is saved as a series of switches in specific positions. DNA can be used to build those switches, too, say scientists who worked on the new study. They call their bio-switch a transcriptor. And it could be used with other DNA devices to build biological computers. Transistors work by controlling the flow of electricity. In one position, they let the electricity pass. In the other position, they stop the flow. A DNA switch wouldn’t affect electricity. Instead, such a device would work by either making a molecule called a protein or not.

Scientists build a transistor from DNA In a computer, a transistor acts like a tiny switch that can be turned on or off. Computer processors, or “chips,” use hundreds of millions — and often billions — of transistors to keep information flowing. They’re used for memory, too. For example, a photograph on a memory card is saved as a series of switches in specific positions. DNA can be used to build those switches, too, say scientists who worked on the new study. They call their bio-switch a transcriptor. And it could be used with other DNA devices to build biological computers. Transistors work by controlling the flow of electricity. In one position, they let the electricity pass. In the other position, they stop the flow. A DNA switch wouldn’t affect electricity. Instead, such a device would work by either making a molecule called a protein or not.

Scientists build a transistor from DNA In a computer, a transistor acts like a tiny switch that can be turned on or off. Computer processors, or “chips,” use hundreds of millions — and often billions — of transistors to keep information flowing. They’re used for memory, too. For example, a photograph on a memory card is saved as a series of switches in specific positions. DNA can be used to build those switches, too, say scientists who worked on the new study. They call their bio-switch a transcriptor. And it could be used with other DNA devices to build biological computers. Transistors work by controlling the flow of electricity. In one position, they let the electricity pass. In the other position, they stop the flow. A DNA switch wouldn’t affect electricity. Instead, such a device would work by either making a molecule called a protein or not.

Read More

Touchscreen Chromebook Pixel: Google's answer to Apple MacBook Pro with Retina display! Google is adding a new and more expensive touch to its line of Chrome laptops in an attempt to outshine personal computers running on software made by rivals Microsoft and Apple. The Chromebook Pixel unveiled on Thursday includes a nearly 13-inch display screen that responds to the touch or swipe of a finger. That duplicates a key feature in Microsoft's Windows 8, a dramatic makeover of the world's leading operating system for PCs. More info - http://ibnlive.in.com/photogallery/12666-2.html

Touchscreen Chromebook Pixel: Google's answer to Apple MacBook Pro with Retina display! Google is adding a new and more expensive touch to its line of Chrome laptops in an attempt to outshine personal computers running on software made by rivals Microsoft and Apple. The Chromebook Pixel unveiled on Thursday includes a nearly 13-inch display screen that responds to the touch or swipe of a finger. That duplicates a key feature in Microsoft's Windows 8, a dramatic makeover of the world's leading operating system for PCs. More info - http://ibnlive.in.com/photogallery/12666-2.html

Touchscreen Chromebook Pixel: Google's answer to Apple MacBook Pro with Retina display! Google is adding a new and more expensive touch to its line of Chrome laptops in an attempt to outshine personal computers running on software made by rivals Microsoft and Apple. The Chromebook Pixel unveiled on Thursday includes a nearly 13-inch display screen that responds to the touch or swipe of a finger. That duplicates a key feature in Microsoft's Windows 8, a dramatic makeover of the world's leading operating system for PCs. More info - http://ibnlive.in.com/photogallery/12666-2.html

Read More

:: The second that almost brought down the Internet :: The weekend was pretty disastrous for websites around the Internet. First, storms in United States knocked out power in Amazon's data centres, and with it, around 1% of American websites. This included popular websites like Foursquare, Instagram, Pinterest and Netflix. (See: Instagram, Pinterest suffer extended outages after US storms) Then, just as websites were hobbling back to life, the "leap second" bug struck. Timekeepers had announced plans to add an extra second to June 30, to compensate for Earth's movement around the Sun. This "leap second" is added to the International Atomic Time (TAI) to ensure that Earth's clocks stay in-sync with "solar-time". Many computers use Network Time Protocol (NTP) to keep their clocks synchronised with the International Atomic Time. When the atomic time keepers added a second at 23:59:59 on Saturday, just like they said they would, all hell broke lose. Servers, especially those running on some versions of Java and Linux, choked on the "leap second", bringing down with them some of the most popular websites in the world.

:: The second that almost brought down the Internet :: The weekend was pretty disastrous for websites around the Internet. First, storms in United States knocked out power in Amazon's data centres, and with it, around 1% of American websites. This included popular websites like Foursquare, Instagram, Pinterest and Netflix. (See: Instagram, Pinterest suffer extended outages after US storms) Then, just as websites were hobbling back to life, the "leap second" bug struck. Timekeepers had announced plans to add an extra second to June 30, to compensate for Earth's movement around the Sun. This "leap second" is added to the International Atomic Time (TAI) to ensure that Earth's clocks stay in-sync with "solar-time". Many computers use Network Time Protocol (NTP) to keep their clocks synchronised with the International Atomic Time. When the atomic time keepers added a second at 23:59:59 on Saturday, just like they said they would, all hell broke lose. Servers, especially those running on some versions of Java and Linux, choked on the "leap second", bringing down with them some of the most popular websites in the world.

:: The second that almost brought down the Internet :: The weekend was pretty disastrous for websites around the Internet. First, storms in United States knocked out power in Amazon's data centres, and with it, around 1% of American websites. This included popular websites like Foursquare, Instagram, Pinterest and Netflix. (See: Instagram, Pinterest suffer extended outages after US storms) Then, just as websites were hobbling back to life, the "leap second" bug struck. Timekeepers had announced plans to add an extra second to June 30, to compensate for Earth's movement around the Sun. This "leap second" is added to the International Atomic Time (TAI) to ensure that Earth's clocks stay in-sync with "solar-time". Many computers use Network Time Protocol (NTP) to keep their clocks synchronised with the International Atomic Time. When the atomic time keepers added a second at 23:59:59 on Saturday, just like they said they would, all hell broke lose. Servers, especially those running on some versions of Java and Linux, choked on the "leap second", bringing down with them some of the most popular websites in the world.

Read More

:: How Google's Drive helps kill Microsoft's Office :: This is how a search company can steal the productivity business: By storing work, not helping users edit it. Google's hard drive in the sky, Google Drive, is a big threat to other cloud storage products like Dropbox and Box. But it's also a stab straight at the heart of Microsoft's mainstream business software, Microsoft Office. While Google's productivity application suites, Docs (now incorporated into Drive) and Apps (for businesses), have been making some headway into Microsoft Office's territory, the important battlefield is not the application. It's the data. If Google can move the battlefield to a place where it has the bigger army and better weapons, the whole game changes. Google Drive might make that happen. Let's look at the world from behind Google-colored glasses. Every time a user performs a search in the Google search engine, or clicks a link in Chrome, or +1s an item in Plus, Google adds an atom of data to its knowledge of what people like and what they do. This information helps Google index the Web and rank its results when people are searching for something. This is also the Facebook model, by the way. Moreover, every action that generates user data that doesn't touch down in a Google product or service deprives Google of information that it could otherwise use to index and understand the Web of human knowledge and preference. Microsoft Word documents stored on PCs? In the most uncharitable view, every one is money being stolen from Google. All closed, siloed apps, for that matter, remove opportunity from Google. Co-founder Sergey Brin has recently spoken out against apps and companies that wall off data from the open Internet. There is indeed a danger, but it's not just about openness, it's about Google's own ability to index the data. Back to Google Drive: By acting as the substrate for user data -- in other words, the file system -- Google gets exposed to many times more information. Google doesn't need, and in fact has no reason, to make this data public, but having it available to index and cross-reference does make the company's core service, targeted advertising, more valuable. The more data Google has, the more valuable its product becomes. And that product, in case it's not already clear, is you. Your attention, which is sold to advertisers. Microsoft's main product, meanwhile, is software, not data. (And its customers aren't advertisers, but people who buy software.) So why can't Microsoft's model and Google's live in harmony? Because Microsoft's software suite consists of application software and an operating system, and the operating system stores user data, and the data is what Google wants. So Google is undermining that function with Google Drive, and not just by offering a synchronized file system (which, by the way, Microsoft also offers). Once users put their data in Google Drive, they will also find out how easy it is to open these files in non-Microsoft apps. This is one of the reasons Google is launching Google Drive with an API for developers and a suite of partner products that shave off Microsoft customers a bit at a time. One of the most important features that third-party developers are using with Google Drive is the "Open with" feature. If you upload a Microsoft Project file to Drive, for example, you can open it with the Web app SmartSheet, directly on the Web. Similarly, Web apps like SlideRocket can open PowerPoint files. Google's own productivity apps can also open Microsoft files. The more people realize that they don't need Office to access their archives of files from the pre-Google Drive era, the more likely they are to look to Google Drive (or perhaps competing products, if they have similar partners) as primary storage. And Google wins, while Microsoft loses. How can Microsoft counter this market erosion at Google's hands? The company has its own cloud storage product and a strong history with developers. And it has the business customers. But according to a Google Drive developer I spoke with, one who's been dealing also with Microsoft for years, Microsoft is not there yet. It has the centralized storage in SkyDrive and Office 365, but not the infrastructure -- especially the identity and sign-on tools -- that developers need to integrate into the Microsoft cloud. Microsoft also needs to protect its software licensing revenue for Office. Google, the upstart in business software, can undercut Microsoft's prices since all its software sales are incremental on top of its search and advertising businesses. Other companies realize that whoever controls the data controls the market. Box, for instance, just launched OneCloud, which lets you open documents in a variety of apps. It's mobile-only so far, though. It is no longer a PC world, and because of that Microsoft doesn't own the world of work. People do their jobs on their own computers, on the Web, and on mobile devices; and they expect their work to follow them onto whatever hardware they're using. Every major technology company understands this. But only a few have the products, the infrastructure, and the freedom to get ahead of the shift.

:: How Google's Drive helps kill Microsoft's Office :: This is how a search company can steal the productivity business: By storing work, not helping users edit it. Google's hard drive in the sky, Google Drive, is a big threat to other cloud storage products like Dropbox and Box. But it's also a stab straight at the heart of Microsoft's mainstream business software, Microsoft Office. While Google's productivity application suites, Docs (now incorporated into Drive) and Apps (for businesses), have been making some headway into Microsoft Office's territory, the important battlefield is not the application. It's the data. If Google can move the battlefield to a place where it has the bigger army and better weapons, the whole game changes. Google Drive might make that happen. Let's look at the world from behind Google-colored glasses. Every time a user performs a search in the Google search engine, or clicks a link in Chrome, or +1s an item in Plus, Google adds an atom of data to its knowledge of what people like and what they do. This information helps Google index the Web and rank its results when people are searching for something. This is also the Facebook model, by the way. Moreover, every action that generates user data that doesn't touch down in a Google product or service deprives Google of information that it could otherwise use to index and understand the Web of human knowledge and preference. Microsoft Word documents stored on PCs? In the most uncharitable view, every one is money being stolen from Google. All closed, siloed apps, for that matter, remove opportunity from Google. Co-founder Sergey Brin has recently spoken out against apps and companies that wall off data from the open Internet. There is indeed a danger, but it's not just about openness, it's about Google's own ability to index the data. Back to Google Drive: By acting as the substrate for user data -- in other words, the file system -- Google gets exposed to many times more information. Google doesn't need, and in fact has no reason, to make this data public, but having it available to index and cross-reference does make the company's core service, targeted advertising, more valuable. The more data Google has, the more valuable its product becomes. And that product, in case it's not already clear, is you. Your attention, which is sold to advertisers. Microsoft's main product, meanwhile, is software, not data. (And its customers aren't advertisers, but people who buy software.) So why can't Microsoft's model and Google's live in harmony? Because Microsoft's software suite consists of application software and an operating system, and the operating system stores user data, and the data is what Google wants. So Google is undermining that function with Google Drive, and not just by offering a synchronized file system (which, by the way, Microsoft also offers). Once users put their data in Google Drive, they will also find out how easy it is to open these files in non-Microsoft apps. This is one of the reasons Google is launching Google Drive with an API for developers and a suite of partner products that shave off Microsoft customers a bit at a time. One of the most important features that third-party developers are using with Google Drive is the "Open with" feature. If you upload a Microsoft Project file to Drive, for example, you can open it with the Web app SmartSheet, directly on the Web. Similarly, Web apps like SlideRocket can open PowerPoint files. Google's own productivity apps can also open Microsoft files. The more people realize that they don't need Office to access their archives of files from the pre-Google Drive era, the more likely they are to look to Google Drive (or perhaps competing products, if they have similar partners) as primary storage. And Google wins, while Microsoft loses. How can Microsoft counter this market erosion at Google's hands? The company has its own cloud storage product and a strong history with developers. And it has the business customers. But according to a Google Drive developer I spoke with, one who's been dealing also with Microsoft for years, Microsoft is not there yet. It has the centralized storage in SkyDrive and Office 365, but not the infrastructure -- especially the identity and sign-on tools -- that developers need to integrate into the Microsoft cloud. Microsoft also needs to protect its software licensing revenue for Office. Google, the upstart in business software, can undercut Microsoft's prices since all its software sales are incremental on top of its search and advertising businesses. Other companies realize that whoever controls the data controls the market. Box, for instance, just launched OneCloud, which lets you open documents in a variety of apps. It's mobile-only so far, though. It is no longer a PC world, and because of that Microsoft doesn't own the world of work. People do their jobs on their own computers, on the Web, and on mobile devices; and they expect their work to follow them onto whatever hardware they're using. Every major technology company understands this. But only a few have the products, the infrastructure, and the freedom to get ahead of the shift.

:: How Google's Drive helps kill Microsoft's Office :: This is how a search company can steal the productivity business: By storing work, not helping users edit it. Google's hard drive in the sky, Google Drive, is a big threat to other cloud storage products like Dropbox and Box. But it's also a stab straight at the heart of Microsoft's mainstream business software, Microsoft Office. While Google's productivity application suites, Docs (now incorporated into Drive) and Apps (for businesses), have been making some headway into Microsoft Office's territory, the important battlefield is not the application. It's the data. If Google can move the battlefield to a place where it has the bigger army and better weapons, the whole game changes. Google Drive might make that happen. Let's look at the world from behind Google-colored glasses. Every time a user performs a search in the Google search engine, or clicks a link in Chrome, or +1s an item in Plus, Google adds an atom of data to its knowledge of what people like and what they do. This information helps Google index the Web and rank its results when people are searching for something. This is also the Facebook model, by the way. Moreover, every action that generates user data that doesn't touch down in a Google product or service deprives Google of information that it could otherwise use to index and understand the Web of human knowledge and preference. Microsoft Word documents stored on PCs? In the most uncharitable view, every one is money being stolen from Google. All closed, siloed apps, for that matter, remove opportunity from Google. Co-founder Sergey Brin has recently spoken out against apps and companies that wall off data from the open Internet. There is indeed a danger, but it's not just about openness, it's about Google's own ability to index the data. Back to Google Drive: By acting as the substrate for user data -- in other words, the file system -- Google gets exposed to many times more information. Google doesn't need, and in fact has no reason, to make this data public, but having it available to index and cross-reference does make the company's core service, targeted advertising, more valuable. The more data Google has, the more valuable its product becomes. And that product, in case it's not already clear, is you. Your attention, which is sold to advertisers. Microsoft's main product, meanwhile, is software, not data. (And its customers aren't advertisers, but people who buy software.) So why can't Microsoft's model and Google's live in harmony? Because Microsoft's software suite consists of application software and an operating system, and the operating system stores user data, and the data is what Google wants. So Google is undermining that function with Google Drive, and not just by offering a synchronized file system (which, by the way, Microsoft also offers). Once users put their data in Google Drive, they will also find out how easy it is to open these files in non-Microsoft apps. This is one of the reasons Google is launching Google Drive with an API for developers and a suite of partner products that shave off Microsoft customers a bit at a time. One of the most important features that third-party developers are using with Google Drive is the "Open with" feature. If you upload a Microsoft Project file to Drive, for example, you can open it with the Web app SmartSheet, directly on the Web. Similarly, Web apps like SlideRocket can open PowerPoint files. Google's own productivity apps can also open Microsoft files. The more people realize that they don't need Office to access their archives of files from the pre-Google Drive era, the more likely they are to look to Google Drive (or perhaps competing products, if they have similar partners) as primary storage. And Google wins, while Microsoft loses. How can Microsoft counter this market erosion at Google's hands? The company has its own cloud storage product and a strong history with developers. And it has the business customers. But according to a Google Drive developer I spoke with, one who's been dealing also with Microsoft for years, Microsoft is not there yet. It has the centralized storage in SkyDrive and Office 365, but not the infrastructure -- especially the identity and sign-on tools -- that developers need to integrate into the Microsoft cloud. Microsoft also needs to protect its software licensing revenue for Office. Google, the upstart in business software, can undercut Microsoft's prices since all its software sales are incremental on top of its search and advertising businesses. Other companies realize that whoever controls the data controls the market. Box, for instance, just launched OneCloud, which lets you open documents in a variety of apps. It's mobile-only so far, though. It is no longer a PC world, and because of that Microsoft doesn't own the world of work. People do their jobs on their own computers, on the Web, and on mobile devices; and they expect their work to follow them onto whatever hardware they're using. Every major technology company understands this. But only a few have the products, the infrastructure, and the freedom to get ahead of the shift.

Read More

:: JForce Flash Drive Will Connect to Computers and Supports Some Android Devices :: A company called JForce from Japan has an interesting new flash drive with 4 GB of storage inside. One end the flash drive has a standard USB plug and on the other is a microUSB plug. The drive will connect to Android tablets and smartphones for moving data around. Power consumption for the flash drive is 250mA max so it won’t drain your battery too badly. The flash drive isn’t particularly fast at 50MB/s but if you really want to get data to and from your smartphone or tablet, you might not mind. The drive apparently supports some Android devices from Sony, Panasonic, Samsung, Sony, and others. It’s important to note that out of devices from those companies are only 10 smartphones and five tablets are listed that this flash drive will work with

:: JForce Flash Drive Will Connect to Computers and Supports Some Android Devices :: A company called JForce from Japan has an interesting new flash drive with 4 GB of storage inside. One end the flash drive has a standard USB plug and on the other is a microUSB plug. The drive will connect to Android tablets and smartphones for moving data around. Power consumption for the flash drive is 250mA max so it won’t drain your battery too badly. The flash drive isn’t particularly fast at 50MB/s but if you really want to get data to and from your smartphone or tablet, you might not mind. The drive apparently supports some Android devices from Sony, Panasonic, Samsung, Sony, and others. It’s important to note that out of devices from those companies are only 10 smartphones and five tablets are listed that this flash drive will work with

:: JForce Flash Drive Will Connect to Computers and Supports Some Android Devices :: A company called JForce from Japan has an interesting new flash drive with 4 GB of storage inside. One end the flash drive has a standard USB plug and on the other is a microUSB plug. The drive will connect to Android tablets and smartphones for moving data around. Power consumption for the flash drive is 250mA max so it won’t drain your battery too badly. The flash drive isn’t particularly fast at 50MB/s but if you really want to get data to and from your smartphone or tablet, you might not mind. The drive apparently supports some Android devices from Sony, Panasonic, Samsung, Sony, and others. It’s important to note that out of devices from those companies are only 10 smartphones and five tablets are listed that this flash drive will work with

Read More